Thursday 28th July 2016
NEWS TICKER: JULY 28TH 2016: The Prysmian Group's first-half results are marked by revenue growth and a significant improvement in profitability. Explains CEO Valerio Battista. "The biggest drivers of growth have been Energy Projects and Telecom. The important set of technological innovations introduced between end of 2015 and 2016, involving the launch of the 600kV and 700kV cable systems, combined with greater project execution capabilities, involving the commissioning of Ulisse, the Group's third cable vessel, mean the Group is well positioned to continue taking advantage of the opportunities offered by the market. In the Telecom business, growth has been driven by the recovery in optical fibre competitiveness and the new optical cable manufacturing capacity in Eastern Europe. Performance by the higher value-added businesses has contributed to a fresh upturn in profitability, with a significant improvement in margins, also thanks to our actions to reduce fixed costs and rationalise manufacturing footprint. The newly acquired Oman Cables Industry has also made an important contribution in this regard." – The Samsung Electronics board has decided to make additional investments in Samsung Venture Investment Corporation's, an affiliated company of Samsung Electronics, New Technology Investment Funds. SVIC plans to establish a new venture fund, SVIC 32. SVIC 32 is a cooperative fund with its investment focus on the latest technologies to enhance competitiveness of existing set businesses and identify future growth businesses. The transaction is expected occur during the third quarter of 2016. The transaction size is KRW 198bn (99% of the total fund: KRW200bn) -- As a slug of generally positive data emerges from the UK this week, and commenting on today’s corporate results, Richard Marwood, senior fund manager at Royal London Asset Management, says, “Today’s flurry of corporate earnings suggests that as yet the outcome of the EU referendum has not had a major impact on many UK listed companies, outside of the movements in currencies. Without a clear financial picture of the impact, many CEOs are at pains to highlight the resilience of their business and their willingness to take strong action if required. I would expect the bid for ARM to herald a period of heightened corporate activity. The increased offer for Premier Farnell is another clear example of overseas bidders taking advantage of a depressed pound to snap up UK assets.” -- Singapore Exchange (SGX) today welcomed EC World REIT to Mainboard under the stock code “BWCU”. EC World REIT is the first Chinese specialised logistics and e-commerce logistics REIT to be listed on SGX. With an initial geographical focus on the People’s Republic of China (PRC), the REIT invests in a diversified portfolio of income-producing real estate primarily used for e-commerce, supply-chain management and logistics purposes. Peter Lai Hock Meng, Chief Executive Officer of EC World Asset Management Pte. Ltd., the Manager of EC World REIT, said, “We are pleased to celebrate EC World REIT’s successful listing and trading today and we would like to extend our sincere appreciation to all investors for making this milestone possible. Our IPO portfolio of six quality properties offers investors unique exposure to the logistics and e-commerce sectors in Hangzhou - one of the largest e-commerce hubs in China.” – Emerging markets assets benefitted in the Asian session today as the dollar retreated following the US Fed’s decision yesterday to do nothing. Yields on US government bonds declined slightly in the hours following the release of the monetary policy statement. The fall on the long end was with 6 basis points and was more pronounced than the drop on the short end of 3 basis points (bps). The dollar lost 3/4 of a cent vs the euro and stood this morning at 1.107 EUR/USD. The Federal Reserve stopped short of signalling a near-term increase in US interest rates, and while a December move is seen as likely, markets are focusing instead on the extra stimulus Japan's government is expected to deliver tomorrow. A subsequent retreat in the retreat boosted emerging assets in the Asian session with stocks at new 11-month highs despite fresh wobbles on Chinese equity markets. The Straits Times Index meantime (STI) ended 23.88 points or 0.81% lower to 2917.61, taking the year-to-date performance to +1.21%. The top active stocks today were DBS, which declined 2.34%, Singtel, which declined 0.46%, UOB, which declined 1.27%, OCBC Bank, which declined 0.57% and Wilmar Intl, with a close unchanged. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index gained 0.04%, while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index declined 0.88%. MSCI's emerging equity index rose 0.25% despite pullbacks in Asian markets, where some concern is rising over volatility in China and the weakening yen. Elsewhere in Asia, Chinese shares fell as much as 3% at one point before recovering as new regulations are expected to prompt wealth managers at small banks to bail out of stocks and into bonds. Elsewhere, the Turkish lira continues to recover, firming to one-week highs. In emerging Europe, Turkish assets continued their post-coup recovery, shrugging off a worsening crackdown on alleged plotters. Stocks jumped 1 percent to one-week highs while the lira was flat, also near one-week highs. Turkey's economic confidence index hit also touched its highest level so far this year in July, rising 14.9% to 95.7. In Africa meantime, the temperature is different. the Nigerian naira hit new record lows against the dollar on Wednesday, shrugging off a rate increase of 200 basis points (bps). Traders are also waiting to see if Egypt will announce plans to devalue its pound at a central bank meeting. Cairo stocks pulled off three-month highs hit after news the government was in loan talks with the International Monetary Fund. The government’s 2025 dollar bond, which rose 4% after the news, eased half a percent. Poland too is in the spotlight today as the European Commission's statement yesterday gave Warsaw three months to address rule of law concerns. In early trading today Polish stocks extended losses, falling 0.7% and the zloty lost 0.2.%.

Latest Video

Avoid investing in German financial assets

Wednesday, 09 May 2012 Written by 
Avoid investing in German financial assets It may seem tempting to invest in German financial or property assets: Germany's economic and financial situation is at present far better than that of the other euro-zone countries, and German assets have outperformed those of the other euro-zone countries. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

It may seem tempting to invest in German financial or property assets: Germany's economic and financial situation is at present far better than that of the other euro-zone countries, and German assets have outperformed those of the other euro-zone countries.

But it should be realised that: German assets are overvalued because the euro zone's monetary policy is too expansionary for Germany and because German investors have a very significant domestic bias while the supply of assets is small and Germany risks economic and financial overheating which could lead to a correction in asset prices in the medium term.

German financial assets might seem attractive
German financial and property assets might seem attractive for two reasons. First, because the present economic and financial situation in Germany is far better than in other euro-zone countries. This is reflected in its public finances, current-account balance, the size of its industry and export capacity, its cost-competitiveness, corporate profitability and investment drive, and in its labour market - which is now experiencing rises in real wages, compared to falling real wages in the rest of the euro zone. All in all, given that Germany does not need to reduce its fiscal deficit, and given the rise in real wages, better export performance, increasing business investment and job creation, the growth outlook is at present far better in Germany than in the other euro-zone countries.



The second reason why German assets could seem attractive is that their recent performance has been strong. This is true for government bonds, equities, corporate bonds, bank debts and residential real estate (but not commercial real estate), since 2008.

But in reality, investment in German assets should be avoided, because they are too expensive and Germany could start overheating

German assets are too expensive
Since 2006, Germany has witnessed and will continue to maintain stronger growth than the euro zone as a whole. This means that the euro zone's current monetary policy is too expansionary for Germany, as it was for the rest of the euro zone from 2002 to 2007. This of course tends to cause a rise in asset prices.

Also, Germany has excess savings (by households and companies, as shown by its external surplus) with an increasing bias for investing domestically, while at the same time the supply of assets is small: meaning the fiscal deficit has almost disappeared, companies are self-financed and issue few bonds and residential construction is at a low level. There is therefore ex ante excess demand for German assets, which has driven up asset prices, especially for safe-haven government bonds.

Germany could start overheating in the medium term
Germany is practically in a situation of full employment, and since its companies are very profitable, wage growth is accelerating. In 2012-2013 an increase in the unit wage cost approaching 3% can be expected, with productivity gains that are fairly low. This will probably lead to a rise in underlying inflation towards 2%, and hence to even more abnormally low long-term interest rates, which will continue to push up the prices of other assets.

It is well known that such a situation of overheating (full employment and interest rates that are too low relative to growth) is potentially unstable and can lead to a downward correction in asset prices (as it occurred in Spain, Ireland and the United States, for example).

Patrick Artus

A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique, of Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Adminstration Economique and of Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris, Patrick Artus is today the Chief Economist at Natixis. He began his career in 1975 where his work included economic forecasting and modelisation. He then worked at the Economics Department of the OECD (1980), before becoming Head of Research at the ENSAE. Thereafter, Patrick taught seminars on research at Paris Dauphine (1982) and was Professor at a number of Universities (including Dauphine, ENSAE, Centre des Hautes Etudes de l'Armement, Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées and HEC Lausanne).

Patrick is now Professor of Economics at University Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. He combines these responsibilities with his research work at Natixis. Patrick was awarded "Best Economist of the year 1996" by the "Nouvel Economiste", and today is a member of the council of economic advisors to the French Prime Minister. He is also a board member at Total and Ipsos.

Website: cib.natixis.com/research/economic.aspx

Related News

Related Articles

Related Blogs

Related Videos

Current Issue

TWITTER FEED