Saturday 25th April 2015
NEWS TICKER: FRIDAY, APRIL 24th 2015:Luc Luyet, CIIA – Senior Market Analyst AT Swissquote says that yesterday, “the SNB surprised the market by announcing that the number of sight deposit account holders that are exempt from negative interest has been reduced. This decision doesn’t change much the domestic banks’ situation as the “20 times the minimum reserve requirement” rule is still running. On the other side, the institutions associated with the Confederation, such as the pension fund of the Confederation or the pension fund of the SNB, are no longer exempt of negative interest. Consequently, only the account holders of the national social security system are still fully exempt.” - High yield debt issuance remains buoyant. Issuance volume for the week ending April 17, 2015, slowed down a bit from the previous week, but remained strong. Junk bond, or high-yield debt, issuers continued to issue bonds as yields remained favourable. High-yield debt is tracked by the SPDR Barclays Capital High Yield Bond ETF and the iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond Fund. According to data from S&P Capital IQ/LCD, dollar-denominated bonds amounting to $10.75bn were issued across 16 transactions in the week ending April 17th. The issuance volume fell by 3.2% from the week ending April 10. Pricing was evenly spread across the week. The number of transactions fell from 18 to 16 week-over-week. Last week brought the total US dollar issuance of high-yield debt to $115.8bn in 2015 YTD, up some 15% from the same period in 2014, the bulk of which is refinancing of older debt - Moody's says EMEA auto ABS performance remained stable during the three-month period ending February 2015. The sector's average performance trend was positive in terms of delinquency ratios and cumulative losses. The 60+ day delinquencies decreased to 0.66% in February 2015 from 0.77% in February 2014, while cumulative defaults decreased to 1.06% from 1.20% over the same period. This decrease was due mainly to the good performance of the German and Dutch markets. The prepayment rate increased slightly to 13.49% in February 2015 from 13.30% a year earlier. As of February 2015, the pool balance of all outstanding rated auto ABS transactions was €27.55bn - According to Sino specialists Red Pulse, China’s State Council is considering allowing daily repatriation for QFII. Currently, RQFII enjoys T+1 repatriation while QFII is restricted to T+5. QFII is the largest channel for foreign investment into China with quota of USD150bn, however, only half of the quota is in use, like at least partly due to the five-day repatriation stipulation - Malaysia’s state pension fund will offer a Shari’a-compliant investment option for its members by 2017, Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak said today. Najib says it will create the largest Shari’a fund of its kind in the world. Malaysia has one of the world’s largest Islamic finance sectors and the authorities are keen to develop it further. They envision the industry accounting for 40% of the country’s total banking assets by 2020 compared with latest figures of around 23% released last year. The $160bn (MYR577.4bn) Employees Provident Fund (EPF) already invests about a third of its portfolio in stocks and bonds that comply with Islamic principles, which ban interest payments and pure monetary speculation. The fund reportedly hired consultants last year to study the feasibility of a state-backed pension fund focusing entirely on Shari’a-compliant investments. Additionally, local press reports says that Malaysia’s sovereign wealth fund Khazanah Nasional has received regulatory approval to issue a MYR1billion (around $275m) socially responsible Islamic bond - The NASDAQ OMX Group, Inc has declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0.25 per share on the company's outstanding common stock, an increase of 67% from the prior $0.15 per share quarterly dividend. The dividend is payable on June 26TH 2015, to shareowners of record at the close of business on June 12TH 2015 - Lazard Ltd today reported operating revenue1 of $581m for the quarter ended March 31st. Adjusted net income was $103m, or $0.77 (diluted) per share for the quarter. These results exclude a pre-tax charge of $63m relating to a debt refinancing2. Q1 2015 net income on a U.S. GAAP basis, including the pre-tax charge, was $56m, or $0.42 (diluted) per share. "Our Financial Advisory and Asset Management businesses continue their strong performance," says Kenneth M. Jacobs, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Lazard. "In the first quarter, we refinanced and repaid a portion of Lazard's long-term debt, significantly reducing our interest costs," adds Matthieu Bucaille, chief financial officer of Lazard. "Consistent with our capital management objectives, we have increased the quarterly dividend by 17%, the fifth increase in as many years." -

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The European Review

By Patrick Artus, chief economist at Natixis

The eurozone crisis may last 20 years

Friday, 24 August 2012 Written by 
The eurozone crisis may last 20 years Financial markets should not be complacent when considering the timeframe of the eurozone’s recovery. Indeed, there are many conditions that need to be met before the region can officially exit the crisis. For instance, a complete reindustrialisation of countries with a deficit is needed, as well as the implementation of long-term developments, including rebalancing countries’ balance sheets, eliminating fiscal deficits, ensuring structural external deficits disappear, and creating jobs to replace those lost at the beginning of the credit crisis. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Financial markets should not be complacent when considering the timeframe of the eurozone’s recovery. Indeed, there are many conditions that need to be met before the region can officially exit the crisis.

For instance, a complete reindustrialisation of countries with a deficit is needed, as well as the implementation of long-term developments, including rebalancing countries’ balance sheets, eliminating fiscal deficits, ensuring structural external deficits disappear, and creating jobs to replace those lost at the beginning of the credit crisis.

A further option, largely rejected across the region, would be to apply elements of federalism to the region in place of wiping external deficits, where the eurozone will act as a ‘transfer union’ that allows for monetary transfers from surplus countries to deficit countries.

During the lengthy process of ensuring all of these conditions are met, there will be a risk of major and long-lasting economic, financial, social and political instability. For the financial markets, this points to a depressed level for asset prices due to the high levels of risk volatility.



The financial markets sometimes believe that the eurozone crisis will be solved rapidly

Admittedly, there has been progress – albeit rather limited – towards solving the eurozone crisis. For instance, the European Central Bank implemented Very Long-Term Refinancing Operations (VLTRO) in late 2011, and the European summit in June 2012 resulted in positive decisions for banking supervision and recapitalisation. There is promise too with the likely implementation of the European Security Mechanism.

These actions have all led to a major, although temporary, improvement in financial markets. However, financial market participants should understand that the eurozone crisis will be very long, given the developments that are needed to end it:

The long-term developments required to end the eurozone crisis

1. Rebalancing of balance sheets

In the eurozone as a whole - and especially in some countries such as Spain, Greece, Ireland, and The Netherlands - an imbalance has appeared in the balance sheets of private economic agents between liabilities (due to a very high private-sector debt ratio) and assets (due to the bursting of the real estate bubble and the fall in real estate prices).

As long as this balance sheet mismatch lasts, the private sector has to deleverage and therefore reduce its spending, which leads to sluggish growth. Also, private borrowers’ solvency will remain poor, which means that there is no end in sight for the banks’ problems. 

2. Restoration of full employment

In the aftermath of the Lehman bankruptcy in 2009, there were heavy factory job losses due to the fall in global trade. Afterwards, the bursting of the real estate bubble triggered a decline in construction employment too.

Currently, many countries (e.g. France, Italy, Spain, Greece, Ireland, and Portugal) have a very high level of unemployment. This has generated a depressive cycle, because high unemployment leads to a decline in labour's bargaining power and a fall in real wages.

The crisis will not end before economies have pulled out of this depressive cycle, i.e. when job losses have been offset by new jobs. But this process has not yet even started, and would require several measures to be adopted in order to do so. These would include attracting new activities to these countries and reindustrialising them. This is not happening, however, and is reflected in the on-going decline of industrial production capacity.

3. Elimination of fiscal deficits

The sovereign debt crisis has occurred because of excessive fiscal deficits in many countries. Governments obviously need to eliminate these fiscal deficits in order to permanently drive down long-term interest rates.

But today we can see a very worrying development: the fiscal deficits are not shrinking – on the contrary, they are increasing because of  sluggish activity.

4. If there is no federalism, the structural external deficits must disappear

Some countries (e.g. Spain, Greece, Portugal, and France) have structural external deficits because of the small size of their exporting sectors, especially in industry. This situation is not sustainable, since these countries are accumulating a continuously growing external debt, and will end up becoming insolvent.

There are then only two solutions to this unsustainable situation, both of which will take a very long time: federalism, or reindustrialisation of countries with a deficit.

We should not expect a rapid end to the crisis in the eurozone

For the time-being, we are seeing major problems when it comes to implementing these long-term developments, and federalism is still off the table.

But for the eurozone crisis to end, all of the mentioned conditions must be met.

The economic, financial, social and political uncertainty will therefore be pronounced in the eurozone for a long time to come – we would estimate about 20 years. 

Patrick Artus

A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique, of Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Adminstration Economique and of Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris, Patrick Artus is today the Chief Economist at Natixis. He began his career in 1975 where his work included economic forecasting and modelisation. He then worked at the Economics Department of the OECD (1980), before becoming Head of Research at the ENSAE. Thereafter, Patrick taught seminars on research at Paris Dauphine (1982) and was Professor at a number of Universities (including Dauphine, ENSAE, Centre des Hautes Etudes de l'Armement, Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées and HEC Lausanne).

Patrick is now Professor of Economics at University Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. He combines these responsibilities with his research work at Natixis. Patrick was awarded "Best Economist of the year 1996" by the "Nouvel Economiste", and today is a member of the council of economic advisors to the French Prime Minister. He is also a board member at Total and Ipsos.

Website: cib.natixis.com/research/economic.aspx

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