Tuesday 5th May 2015
NEWS TICKER: FRIDAY, MAY IST: MYOB will return on Monday next to the ASX, selling 228.3mshares at $3.65 in the company’s IPO. The company raised AUD833.1m, giving it an implied market capitalisation of AUD2.13bn. Bain Capital will retain 58% of the firm’s stock. “We saw a significant level of participation from eligible retail noteholders in the offer, with approximately 57% of holders exchanging their notes into shares. We see this wide range of investor interest as a strong vote of confidence in MYOB.” MYOB chairman Justin Milne says. ASX trading in MYOB shares is set to begin on 4 May under the code MYO. MYOB was listed on exchange from 1999 to 2009 – The volume of US municipal bonds soared by 42.1% in April, according to Thomson Reuters’ data; the ninth straight monthly gain. Issuers brought $37.76bn to market in 1,210 issues, up from $26.58bn in 939 issues in April 2014. Low interest rates, and the reluctance of the US Federal Reserve to raise rates over the near term has resulted in a dash by municipal issuers anxious to secure low cost funding as many refinance their debts. Other than refinancing, new issuance per se looks to be tailing off. New money transactions declined by 5.6% to $12.68bn from $13.43bn, while combined refunding and new money transactions increased 42.5% to $7.17bn from $5.03bn in April last year. Negotiated bond sales increased 62.4% to $28.97bn from $17.84bn, competitive deals rose 15.4% to $8.62bn from $7.47 billion and private placements plunged 87.2% to $162mn from $1.26bn. Sales of revenue bonds increased 49.9% to $22.84bn in 421 deals from $15.24bn in 306 deals. General obligation bond volume jumped 29.9% to $14.73bn in 788 issues from $11.34bn in 633 issues. Tax-exempt deals were up 42.4% to $33.88bn, while taxable deals were 24% higher to $3.30bn.Fixed-rate issues increased to $36.75bn in 1,167 issues from $24.85bn in 891 issues the previous year. The volume of deals with bond insurance more than doubled in par amount wrapped to $2.54bn in 161 deals from $1.06bn in 104 transactions. California claimed the top spot among states with $21.47bn of issuance thus far in 2015, up from its No. 2 ranking in the same period of last year with $12.03bn. Texas dropped from first to second with $17.85bn, an increase from $12.31bn the year before. New York remained in third place with $11.91bn so far this year, up from $10.29bn year to date - This morning Lloyds Banking Group said that in Q1 it had made a net profit of £913m and underlying profit was up 21% on the same period last year, to £2.2bn. Moreover, the group said that it was raising its net interest income target above the original target of 2.55%. Graham Spooner, investment research analyst at The Share Centre, says: “These results are good news for investors as they are ahead of forecasts and demonstrate a continued improvement in the company’s performance. The part UK government owned bank additionally reported that it has been benefitting from a resurgent British economy which has led to reduced bad loans and fuelled demand for mortgages. Lloyds announced its first dividend in February since being bailed out and investors should acknowledge that the increasing signs of recovery will boost hopes for a significant dividend growth in the near future. Analysts have become a little more positive on the group and its long term restructuring plans, which appear to be happening faster than expectations. However … the sector [remains] under pressure, as a result of regulatory issues and ahead of the next government sale.” - The Straits Times Index (STI) ended 0.24 points or 0.01% higher to 3487.39, taking the year-to-date performance to +3.63%. The top active stocks today were SingTel, which declined 0.23%, OCBC Bank, which declined 1.84%, DBS, which gained 0.19%, UOB, which gained 0.29% and Keppel Corp, with a 1.02% fall. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index gained 0.47%, while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index rose 0.18%. The outperforming sectors today were represented by the FTSE ST Real Estate Holding and Development Index, which rose 1.00%. The two biggest stocks of the Index - Hongkong Land Holdings and Global Logistic Properties – ended 2.02% higher and 2.23% higher respectively. The underperforming sector was the FTSE ST Consumer Goods Index, which slipped 1.04%. Wilmar International shares remained unchanged and Thai Beverage declined 3.38%.

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The European Review

By Patrick Artus, chief economist at Natixis

The likelihood of another global recession

Monday, 20 August 2012 Written by 
The likelihood of another global recession There is real concern over the present state of the global economy, due to a slowdown in global trade and dwindling production prospects. Indeed, it is not out of the question that another global recession is looming. Economic crises can be found in both the eurozone and the United Kingdom, there is also a marked slowdown in the US economy and continuing stagnation in Japan. There is a justified fear that the crises could spread to open economies via global trade. And although emerging countries could implement expansionary fiscal and monetary policies to allay concerns about their growth models, these policies might not benefit the global economy because of the structural nature of the countries’ problems. The question remains, does the world have the economic policy weapons to combat a new global recession? http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

There is real concern over the present state of the global economy, due to a slowdown in global trade and dwindling production prospects. Indeed, it is not out of the question that another global recession is looming. Economic crises can be found in both the eurozone and the United Kingdom, there is also a marked slowdown in the US economy and continuing stagnation in Japan.

There is a justified fear that the crises could spread to open economies via global trade. And although emerging countries could implement expansionary fiscal and monetary policies to allay concerns about their growth models, these policies might not benefit the global economy because of the structural nature of the countries’ problems. The question remains, does the world have the economic policy weapons to combat a new global recession?

The slowdown in emerging countries’ growth

We would argue that another global recession is a possibility, because – as previously mentioned – the global economy is being hit simultaneously by a number of events.



Since early 2010, in particular, there has been a marked slowdown of growth in large emerging countries, mainly due to these countries’ problematic growth models. For instance: 

  • There has been a loss of competitiveness and profitability in China, due to sharp wage increases since 2010;
  • India has seen a stagnation in its industrial production capacity, partly due to hiring difficulties but also issues to do with its education and labour mobility;
  • Brazil’s exchange rate still has a lasting overvaluation despite the recent depreciation, which has not gone far enough;
  • And there is also the dominating concern that any of the crises could spread to open economies (such as Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea, Sweden and Central European countries) via global trade.

All things considered, the fact that practically all regions are affected means there is a serious threat for global growth.

Fundamentally, we believe the problems are down to:

  • OECD countries continuing to deleverage in public and private sectors;
  • China halting a growth model that was driven by low-end production, exports and migration;
  • the delayed growth in Brazil’s and India’s industry.

Faced with this risk of recession, does the world have the capacity to react with its economic policies?

In OECD countries, there is no longer any room for manoeuvre in monetary policies. This is because interest rates are already very low, and liquidity is already extremely abundant. These countries cannot necessarily implement further fiscal policies because of very high fiscal deficits and public debts. Of course, other options are conceivable, such as quantitative easing in the United States, further VLTROs or asset purchase policies in the eurozone, another extension to the Gilt purchase programme in the United Kingdom, and the creation of liquidity in Japan. But there is a possibility these expansionary monetary policies would have very little effect on the economy.

In emerging countries, interest rates can be lowered. And as the debt ratio is much lower than in OECD countries, in addition to lower fiscal deficits and public debts, monetary policy ought to be more efficient.

The issue is therefore not whether emerging countries are able to conduct more expansionary economic policies, but whether these policies could restore global growth:

(a) If emerging countries have structural economic problems, counter-cyclical policies will not resolve them. Boosting credit and investment in construction by state-owned companies in China would improve neither the sophistication of the product range nor cost-competitiveness. Running fiscal deficits or lowering interest rates in India would not resolve their issues in the education sector. Likewise in Brazil, it would not be able to fix its overvaluation, nor the fall in investment and employment in its industry.

(b) If additional expansionary monetary policies in emerging countries lead to a depreciation of their currencies – which we can see happening now – the situation would improve in emerging countries but deteriorate in OECD countries. Viewed as a whole, there would be no improvement in the situation of the global economy. It is striking to see that even the Chinese RMB has depreciated against the dollar; the Brazilian real and the Indian rupee have depreciated sharply since 2011.

Global growth in 2012-2013 should cause more concern

Current forecasts continue to point to a recovery in global growth between 2012 and 2013 and then in 2014. But we believe there is cause to be more concerned. The reasons for such an outlook lie in the slowdown in growth that affects all regions and has structural causes. Also, OECD countries no longer have the room for manoeuvre to conduct counter-cyclical economic policies. And although emerging countries still have the room to manoeuvre and conduct such policies, the fact remains they could still prove ineffective, regardless.

Patrick Artus

A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique, of Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et de l'Adminstration Economique and of Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris, Patrick Artus is today the Chief Economist at Natixis. He began his career in 1975 where his work included economic forecasting and modelisation. He then worked at the Economics Department of the OECD (1980), before becoming Head of Research at the ENSAE. Thereafter, Patrick taught seminars on research at Paris Dauphine (1982) and was Professor at a number of Universities (including Dauphine, ENSAE, Centre des Hautes Etudes de l'Armement, Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées and HEC Lausanne).

Patrick is now Professor of Economics at University Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne. He combines these responsibilities with his research work at Natixis. Patrick was awarded "Best Economist of the year 1996" by the "Nouvel Economiste", and today is a member of the council of economic advisors to the French Prime Minister. He is also a board member at Total and Ipsos.

Website: cib.natixis.com/research/economic.aspx

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