Tuesday 1st September 2015
NEWS: Friday, August 28TH: The Hong Kong Monetary Authority says it has granted a restricted banking licence to Goldman Sachs Asia Pacific Company Limited (GSAPCL) under the Banking Ordinance. GSAPCL, incorporated in Hong Kong, is a wholly-owned banking subsidiary of the Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. The number of restricted licence banks in Hong Kong is now 24 - Apple launched its first Australian dollar corporate bond issue, raising $1.2bn within two hours this morning. Strong demand for the US tech giant’s fixed and floating, four and seven year Kangaroo bonds saw the firm outstrip predictions it would raise between $500m and $1bn. Apple bonds are popular because the AA+ rated company is considered an ultra-safe investment, although yields are correspondingly low — about 3% on four-year bonds and about 3.8% on seven-year bonds - The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has published the responses received to the Joint Committee Discussion Paper on Key Information Document for PRIIPS. The responses can be downloaded from the regulator's website - Romania’s MV Petrom reportedly is planning a secondary listing on the London Stock Exchange. According to Romanian press reports, the local investment fund Fondul Proprietatea may sell a significant stake in the company via public offering on the Bucharest Stock Exchange and London Stock Exchange. OMV Petrom, with a current market capitalisation of €4.85bn has announced that it will ask its shareholders’ approval for a secondary listing in London. The general shareholders meeting is scheduled for September 22nd. Austrian group OMV, holds 51% of the company’s shares; other shareholders include the Romanian state, via the Energy Ministry, with a 20.6% stake, and investment fund Fondul Proprietatea, which holds 19%. The remaining 9.4% is free-float - Morgan Stanley (NYSE/MS) today announced the launch of a new fund, the IPM Systematic Macro UCITS Fund, under its FundLogic Alternatives plc umbrella. The fund provides exposure to IPM’s Systematic Macro strategy, which is based on IPM’s proprietary investment models that provide unique insights into how fundamental drivers interact with the dynamics of asset price returns. The FundLogic Alternatives Platform currently has more than $2.6bn in assets under management (as of 31 July 2015) and this latest addition expands Morgan Stanley’s offering of global macro strategies - Equities sold off hard this morning as continued pressure on Chinese stocks rippled throughout world markets. Chinese government intervention brought the Shanghai Composite back a positive close; but the question is now, has confidence eroded so much that the market will continue to depend on the government to prop it up? The other key element to consider today is the outcome of the debate in the German parliament on the Greek bailout. Last month, a record 65 lawmakers from the conservative camp broke ranks and refused to back negotiations on the bailout. The daily Bild estimated that up to 120 CDU and CSU members out of 311 might refuse to back the now-agreed deal. However, Chancellor Merkel is looking to secure support from the Social Democrats (SPD), Merkel's junior coalition partner, and the opposition Greens which will likely swing the final decision Greece’s way. However, a rebellion by a large number of her allies would be a blow to the highly popular Chancellor.

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Lessons from an Industry Titan: Jamie Dimon’s Testimony

Friday, 15 June 2012 Written by 
Lessons from an Industry Titan: Jamie Dimon’s Testimony This week, J.P. Morgan Chase’s CEO, the highly regarded Jamie Dimon, testified before the US Senate banking committee regarding the failures of its Chief Investment Office (CIO), the group responsible for certain well-publicized losses. We thought his testimony provided more than a few lessons on governance matters and the state of the world generally. Here they are: http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

This week, J.P. Morgan Chase’s CEO, the highly regarded Jamie Dimon, testified before the US Senate banking committee regarding the failures of its Chief Investment Office (CIO), the group responsible for certain well-publicized losses. We thought his testimony provided more than a few lessons on governance matters and the state of the world generally. Here they are:

"[W]e are still reviewing the facts...”

Lesson: Never speak out publicly in a definitive way until you fully know the facts.  You will not fully know the facts for months.



"...I will explain everything I can to the extent possible."

Lesson: Even for Dimon, transparency matters.

"CIO's strategy...was poorly conceived and vetted.  The strategy was not carefully analyzed or subjected to rigorous stress testing.... CIO's traders did not have the requisite understanding of the risks they took.”

Lesson: Didn’t we learn this lesson in 2008? Back then we learned that some strategies had assumptions that seemed poorly founded in retrospect. This was particularly true about the behavior of the mortgage markets and their derivatives.  Guess the lesson is that most people never learn this lesson. Before a system or strategy is implemented, and periodically thereafter, management (including the board) should ask the probing questions. Make no assumptions on this score.

"Personnel in key control roles in CIO were in transition and risk control functions were generally ineffective in challenging the judgment of CIO's trading personnel.”

Lesson: The press reported that the CIO’s then-current chief risk officer began to internally express his concerns about London office trading strategies last year. This past January, he was replaced as the head of risk by a former trader who, at least according to the press reports, had no prior risk management experience. This lesson relates to human nature: it's very hard to appreciate someone who has a different point of view. Watch out – he may be right.

"Risk Committee structures and processes in CIO were not as formal or robust as they should have been.”

Lesson: Assessments have to be substantive, robust, and “real”, and be tested and documented regularly as assumptions and/or reality changes. Structure, process and formality may not protect you from all losses, but they can provide a protective shield that will hopefully mitigate them. Be sure to build your protective shield. 

 

Deborah Prutzman

Deborah Prutzman is the founder and CEO of The Regulatory Fundamentals Group (RFG), a New York-based firm that designs and implements business and risk solutions for alternative asset managers and institutional investors. RFG's senior-led team employs a robust suite of tools, including practical alerts on new and potential industry developments and its powerful RFG Pathfinder® knowledge management platform which simplifies the challenges of operating in a regulated environment.  To learn more about The Regulatory Fundamentals Group call (212) 537-4058, email a representative at Information@RegFG.com or visit RegFG.com

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