Wednesday 25th May 2016
NEWS TICKER, WEDNESDAY, MAY 25TH: Investec Bank plc has arranged the long term refinancing of a portfolio of four UK projects totalling 40MW solar portfolio owned by Canadian Solar Inc (NASDAQ: CSIQ. The long term debt was provided by Bayern LB after Investec ran competitive process for Canadian Solar. Investec originally provided a short term bridging facility that funded the portfolio shortly after its connection to the electricity grid - The European Energy Exchange (EEX), in its capacity as the transitional common auction platform acting on behalf of Poland, could not execute today's auction of EU Emission Allowances (EUAs), because it would have cleared below the reference price. The reference price is calculated on the basis of the secondary market price during the bidding window. In accordance with the rules governing the auctions (EU Auctioning Regulation), the auction has been cancelled. The auction volume will now be evenly distributed over the next four scheduled auctions. The auction calendar will be adjusted accordingly and an updated version will be published soon. The European Energy Exchange (EEX) is the leading energy exchange in Europe. It develops, operates and connects secure, liquid and transparent markets for energy and commodity products. At EEX, contracts on Power, Coal and Emission Allowances as well as Freight and Agricultural Products are traded or registered for clearing. Alongside EEX, EPEX SPOT, Powernext, Cleartrade Exchange (CLTX) and Gaspoint Nordic are also part of EEX Group. Clearing and settlement of trading transactions are provided by the clearing house European Commodity Clearing (ECC) - Commercial real estate investor Raven Russia has listed on the Channel Islands Securities Exchange (CISE). The firm is already listed on the LSE. Advisers to the transaction were UK legal advisers Berwin Leighton Paisner, Guernsey legal advisers Carey Olsen, broker N+1 Singer and listing sponsor Ravenscroft. The company has also announced a proposed fundraising of a minimum of £105.5m by way of a placing of new convertible redeemable preference shares with the intention that they will be listed solely on the CISE and traded on the SETSqx platform of the LSE - Allianz Global Investors says that that Deborah Zurkow, CIO and Head of Infrastructure Debt, is to take on a new, broader role, becoming head of the alternatives pillar within its global investment platform. Zurkow will join AllianzGI’s Global Executive Committee, effective June 1st. As head of alternatives, Zurkow will lead the continued build out of AllianzGI’s Alternatives capability, which comprises a diverse mix of both liquid and illiquid alternative investment solutions for clients. Since the creation of AllianzGI’s Alternatives pillar in December 2014, assets under management have doubled, growing from €7.9bn in December 2014 to €15.7bn by the end of Q1 2016. Andreas Utermann, chief executive officer and Global CIO at Allianz Global Investors, says, “Over the last few years, Deborah and her team have helped turn the idea of infrastructure debt as an asset class for institutional investors into a reality. In her new, expanded role, Deborah will be able to put her experience of developing innovative solutions that meet clients’ needs to work across the entire spectrum of Alternatives, one of the fastest growing parts of our investment platform, increasingly attractive to investors looking for alpha in era of financial repression.” In other related moves, Claus Fintzen will become CIO and head of Infrastructure Debt, reporting to Deborah Zurkow, assuming day to day responsibility of AllianzGI’s Infrastructure Debt team with immediate effect. Claus joined AllianzGI in 2012 along with Deborah and three other team members from Trifinium Advisors. As well as being instrumental in helping develop AllianzGI’s infrastructure debt platform, Claus brings 21 years of industry experience to the role – Aquila Capital is providing institutional investors with access to its latest diversified renewable energy portfolio (the Aquila Capital Renewables Fund III) via a bond solution. The securitisation, which already has been given an indicative investment grade rating by an ESMA-recognised rating agency, is targeting an A- rating thanks to the high quality of the underlying portfolio, its efficient structure and very modest structuring costs. Both the securitisation and a direct investment in the Fund provide investors with access to a conservative, broadly diversified portfolio of wind and photovoltaic plants in politically stable countries in Western Europe. The Fund is already invested in 13 operational renewable energy plants in Sweden, Germany, the United Kingdom and France, and benefits from a pipeline of potential investments in excess of €350m. Roman Rosslenbroich, chief executive officer and co-founder of Aquila Capital, says: ”We actively had the securitisation reviewed by a reputable audit firm with respect to its regulatory, legal and tax suitability for the Fund’s anchor investor - a leading German insurance company. Due to significant demand, we are now making this investment opportunity available to additional investors.” - UniCredit is entering into the Swiss ETF market by issuing two ETFs with SIX Swiss Exchange, for which it is also acting as market maker. This increases the number of ETF issuers on SIX Swiss Exchange to an unprecedented 22 and the product range on offer to a new record high of 1,240. The two newly listed ETFs on European convertible bonds offer investors a supplement to the diversification of their portfolios, while offering the advantages of on-exchange trading for what was previously an asset class that was heavily OTC-traded The ETFs are the Swiss franc denominated UC Thomson Rts. Bal. European Convertible Bond UCITS ETF ( LU1199448058) and the UC Thomson Rts. Bal. European Convertible Bond UCITS ETF (LU1372156916) –

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Traders Beware, Focus Could Shift Quickly in Your Direction

Monday, 16 July 2012 Written by 
Traders Beware, Focus Could Shift Quickly in Your Direction Some unsettling stories continue to unfold. One is Peregrine Financial Group, which managed to combine some of the most memorable red flags of the Madoff and MF Global scandals without attracting a regulatory response from the CFTC. (PFG represented that it held more than $220 million of customer funds when in reality it held approximately $5.1 million.) http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Some unsettling stories continue to unfold.

One is Peregrine Financial Group, which managed to combine some of the most memorable red flags of the Madoff and MF Global scandals without attracting a regulatory response from the CFTC. (PFG represented that it held more than $220 million of customer funds when in reality it held approximately $5.1 million.)

The second involved information stemming from the Barclay’s Libor scandal—in particular, exactly how much was known, when, and by what regulators.  The NY Fed, confirming that it received reports about Libor issues in 2007 and 2008, on Friday released documents showing it took “prompt action four years ago to highlight problems.”  The actions of Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, who headed the New York Fed from 2003 until 2009, may be heavily scrutinized.  So will those of the U.K. authorities.

And then there is the recent announcement by JPMorgan of possible valuation discrepancies by its traders. According to JPMorgan’s chief financial officer, a restatement may be necessary based upon facts uncovered “regarding the CIO traders’ intent as they were marking the book. And as a result, we questioned the integrity of those trader marks.”



What impact will this have on the regulatory climate?  Clearly, the regulators will be under tremendous pressure.  Richard Shelby, the top Republican on the U.S. Senate Banking Committee, noted Peregrine “raises serious questions about our current regulators and whether they are capable of doing their jobs.”  Others are also voicing concerns.  In turn, the regulators are likely to respond by increasing their oversight.

And as they do so, traders in particular may be in the line of fire.  Reflecting on LIBOR, Warren Buffett is quoted as saying, “the idea that a bunch of traders can start e-mailing each other . . . and play around with . . . [the Libor] rate . . . is not good for the system.”  This is the type of concern that prompted the CFTC this past April to pass rules for swap participants, which basically wall off traders from the rest of the firm.  Traders cannot supervise or influence the compensation of research analysts or clearing unit employees.  In some cases, communications with traders are prohibited unless the communication is made through the firm’s compliance department.  Both the Libor scandal and the J.P. Morgan trading loss, coupled perhaps with a few new situations brewing in the background, might give this type of thinking a major boost.

Deborah Prutzman

Deborah Prutzman is the founder and CEO of The Regulatory Fundamentals Group (RFG), a New York-based firm that designs and implements business and risk solutions for alternative asset managers and institutional investors. RFG's senior-led team employs a robust suite of tools, including practical alerts on new and potential industry developments and its powerful RFG Pathfinder® knowledge management platform which simplifies the challenges of operating in a regulated environment.  To learn more about The Regulatory Fundamentals Group call (212) 537-4058, email a representative at Information@RegFG.com or visit RegFG.com

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