Friday 27th November 2015
NEWS TICKER, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH: In the last six months River and Mercantile Group (R&M) says has been appointed to design, execute and provide ongoing management of over £1.7bn of structured equity options mandates for pension clients, including the Royal Mail Pension Plan and another FTSE 100 company’s pension scheme. James Barham, global head of Distribution at R&M, says, "With increased volatility in equity markets, we have seen a growing number of clients that are taking advantage of our market leading derivative capabilities to manage the downside exposure in their equity portfolios. The derivatives team at R&M has an exceptional long term track record in designing and managing structured equity solutions for clients over the last ten years. We continue to see significant demand from pensions and institutional clients for structured equity to actively manage the profile of their equity investment returns while maintaining their allocation to equities. The design and execution of these mandate demonstrates R&M’s ability to design innovative, outcome oriented solutions for our clients, which are delivered to meet their governance requirements.” - Demand to borrow Asian stocks surged in the wake of the recent market volatility reports Markit. While short sellers have since pulled back slightly, the current demand to borrow shares across the region is still up by a fifth since the start of the year. Short interest across Asia is up by 18% year to date, reaching 2.7% of free float. However, says Markit, Japanese short selling has been relatively flat since the start of the year. The firm adds that consumer sectors have made Australia the most shorted country in the region - Trayport, a provider of energy trading solutions to traders and exchanges, says Power Solutions Enerji Ticaret ve Danışmanlık Anonim Şirketi has chosen Trayport’s GlobalVision Broker Trading SystemSM (BTS) for trading in the Turkish power market. Power Solutions, founded in Turkey in 2015, provides OTC Brokerage services in the Turkish electricity market.. The Trayport BTS offers brokers access to a growing network of traders using Trayport’s trading technology - The Dutch residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) market remained strong during the three-month period ended September 2015, according to the latest indices published by Moody's The 60+ day delinquencies of Dutch RMBS, including Dutch mortgage loans benefitting from a Nationale Hypotheek Garantie, continued to decrease to 0.73% in September 2015 from 0.81% in June 2015. The 90+ day delinquencies also continued to decrease to 0.56% in September 2015 from 0.64% in June 2015. Cumulative defaults increased to 0.78% of the original balance, plus additions (in the case of master issuers) and replenishments, in September 2015 from 0.70% in June 2015. This compares to cumulative defaults of 0.49% in September 2014. Cumulative losses increased to 0.15% in September 2015 from 0.14% in June 2015. Moody's has assigned definitive credit ratings to two new transactions since the last publication of the Index on September 9th, including five classes of notes issued by STORM 2015-II BV. and two classed of notes issued by Hypenn RMBS IV BV. As of the end of September, the 107 Moody's-rated Dutch RMBS transactions had an outstanding pool balance of €217.9bn, representing a year-over-year decrease of 4.8% - Thanksgiving holidays in the US has coloured trading today. In the Asia-Pac, low commodities prices are weighing on the Australian economy. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.3% in thin trading volumes across the whole Asia-Pac region. With the exception of the Australian dollar, trading volumes were ridiculously small EUR/USD traded within a 10 pips range between 1.0615 and 1.0625. Similarly, GBP/USD traded sideways between 1.5115 and 1.5131. According to Yann Quelenn, market analyst at Swissquote: “When commodities price lower, there is a transfer of wealth between exporters (producers) and importers of commodities. The decline favours industries that need commodities as primary source for manufacturing products. Australia is on the exporters’ side. Indeed, an important part of the Australian’s revenues accounts for the revenues on the extraction of gold, silver, platinum and other metals. Materials shares fell 1.3%, and are down 4.6% so far this week, with commodities like copper and nickel having tumbled to multiyear lows. In Japan, The Nikkei Stock Average ended the day up 0.5% at 19944.41, while and South Korea's Kospi rose 1.1%. The Shanghai Composite Index fell 0.3% and Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index closed flat. Japan shares have posted one of the strongest rebounds in the region since September. The Nikkei is the second-best performing market in Asia year to date with a gain of 14%. China's Shenzhen Composite Index is up 65% year to date. The Straits Times Index (STI) ended 6.89 points or 0.24% lower to 2884.69, taking the year-to-date performance to -14.28%. The top active stocks today were OCBC Bank, which declined 0.91%, SingTel, which gained 0.26%, UOB, which declined 1.79%, DBS, which declined 0.36% and Global Logistic, with a 1.91% fall. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index declined 0.05%, while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index declined0.84%.In Brazil, the BCB left rates unchanged at 14.25% yesterday in spite of rampant inflation. The latest economic survey by the central bank showed that inflation expectations are not anchored yet as it is expected to reach 10.33% by year-end and 6.64% by the end of 2016. Broadly, expectations the U.S. Federal Reserve will raise interest rates in December has pushed the yen weaker. The currency has weakened 3.1% against the U.S. dollar in the past three months. Japan shares nevertheless remain vulnerable to global central bank moves and geopolitical tensions - The London Metal Exchange's three-month copper contract closed down 1.3% at $4,549 a metric ton on Wednesday. Copper last traded at $4,692.50 a metric ton, up from the opening price of $4,538 a ton on Thursday. Overnight, the latest U.S. report on jobless claims pointed to a strengthening employment picture, pushing the dollar higher. U.S. stocks ended mostly unchanged as consumer discretionary and health-care shares offset losses in other sectors on the last full trading day of the week before the Thanksgiving holiday. Brent oil futures fell 0.2% to $46.06 a barrel. US crude-oil futures rose 0.2% to $43.13 a barrel. Gold prices were up 0.3% at $1,073.50 a troy ounce.

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Regulatory Update

Traders Beware, Focus Could Shift Quickly in Your Direction

Monday, 16 July 2012 Written by 
Traders Beware, Focus Could Shift Quickly in Your Direction Some unsettling stories continue to unfold. One is Peregrine Financial Group, which managed to combine some of the most memorable red flags of the Madoff and MF Global scandals without attracting a regulatory response from the CFTC. (PFG represented that it held more than $220 million of customer funds when in reality it held approximately $5.1 million.)

Some unsettling stories continue to unfold.

One is Peregrine Financial Group, which managed to combine some of the most memorable red flags of the Madoff and MF Global scandals without attracting a regulatory response from the CFTC. (PFG represented that it held more than $220 million of customer funds when in reality it held approximately $5.1 million.)

The second involved information stemming from the Barclay’s Libor scandal—in particular, exactly how much was known, when, and by what regulators.  The NY Fed, confirming that it received reports about Libor issues in 2007 and 2008, on Friday released documents showing it took “prompt action four years ago to highlight problems.”  The actions of Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, who headed the New York Fed from 2003 until 2009, may be heavily scrutinized.  So will those of the U.K. authorities.

And then there is the recent announcement by JPMorgan of possible valuation discrepancies by its traders. According to JPMorgan’s chief financial officer, a restatement may be necessary based upon facts uncovered “regarding the CIO traders’ intent as they were marking the book. And as a result, we questioned the integrity of those trader marks.”

What impact will this have on the regulatory climate?  Clearly, the regulators will be under tremendous pressure.  Richard Shelby, the top Republican on the U.S. Senate Banking Committee, noted Peregrine “raises serious questions about our current regulators and whether they are capable of doing their jobs.”  Others are also voicing concerns.  In turn, the regulators are likely to respond by increasing their oversight.

And as they do so, traders in particular may be in the line of fire.  Reflecting on LIBOR, Warren Buffett is quoted as saying, “the idea that a bunch of traders can start e-mailing each other . . . and play around with . . . [the Libor] rate . . . is not good for the system.”  This is the type of concern that prompted the CFTC this past April to pass rules for swap participants, which basically wall off traders from the rest of the firm.  Traders cannot supervise or influence the compensation of research analysts or clearing unit employees.  In some cases, communications with traders are prohibited unless the communication is made through the firm’s compliance department.  Both the Libor scandal and the J.P. Morgan trading loss, coupled perhaps with a few new situations brewing in the background, might give this type of thinking a major boost.

Deborah Prutzman

Deborah Prutzman is the founder and CEO of The Regulatory Fundamentals Group (RFG), a New York-based firm that designs and implements business and risk solutions for alternative asset managers and institutional investors. RFG's senior-led team employs a robust suite of tools, including practical alerts on new and potential industry developments and its powerful RFG Pathfinder® knowledge management platform which simplifies the challenges of operating in a regulated environment.  To learn more about The Regulatory Fundamentals Group call (212) 537-4058, email a representative at or visit

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