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NEWS TICKER: JULY 22nd 2016: Apple Inc is planning to open its first Apple Store in Taiwan, a move that comes after the U.S. technology giant raised $1.38 billion in a bond offering last month on the island that is home to many companies in its supply chain -- Taiwan stocks fell in the Asian session today after hitting a more than one-year high in the previous session, tracking losses in overseas markets. The main TAIEX index was down 0.4% at 9,019.87, after closing 0.5% higher in the previous session. Taiwan's export orders from China, in data issued earlier this week, showed slippage in June, hurt by weaker demand for displays, though not by as much as expected. Even so, the Taiwan dollar softened TAD0.019 to TAD32.079 per US dollar - Phillip Capital Group, an Asian financial services provider with $30bn 3 in assets under custody and management, has appointed BNP Paribas Securities Services to service its Singapore-based funds. BNP Paribas Securities Services is a global custodian with USD 9 trillion in assets under custody. Phillip Capital Management (S) Pte Ltd (PCM) has migrated its largest SGD money market fund to BNP Securities Services Singapore. This will help the company enhance operational efficiency and fulfil its regulatory requirements. For example, the company will be able to manage, track and report on its funds in a consistent and timely fashion. The long-term benefits will enable a standardised and scalable approach to custody services being extended into other locations for PCM. Phillip Capital Management (HK) Ltd is also working with BNP Paribas Securities Services to launch a fund in Hong Kong -- Following the event strewn Republican Convention this week, next week it is the turn of the Democrats. The Democratic National Convention is set to take place in Philadelphia from July 25th to 28th. The event is scheduled to be held at the Wells Fargo Center -- China's CSI 300 index and the Shanghai Composite both slipped about 0.5% in the Asian session today, with losses of around 1% for the week. Japan's Nikkei 225 closed down 1.1%, dragged down by the yen's 1% rally on Thursday – a trend that has been apparent all year. The index is still up 0.8% in a week in which it touched an eight-week high thanks to an initially weaker yen and expectations of fiscal and monetary stimulus, though in an interview with BBC radio this week, the Bank of Japan said that it did not believe in ‘helicopter money’ and that its current strategy was adequate to lift the economy out of its funk. The central bank’s next policy decision is expected on July 29th

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Fortunes divide in infrastructure spending in the GCC

Monday, 03 October 2011
Fortunes divide in infrastructure spending in the GCC The growing disparity of fortunes in the GCC project segment was starkly exposed by a Citigroup report, which highlighted the fact that while some $170bn of projects in the United Arab Emirates have been put on hold or cancelled outright, the MENA region has seen a substantial uptick in infrastructure project spend. Who are the winners and runners up in the GCC project stakes right now? http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

The growing disparity of fortunes in the GCC project segment was starkly exposed by a Citigroup report, which highlighted the fact that while some $170bn of projects in the United Arab Emirates have been put on hold or cancelled outright, the MENA region has seen a substantial uptick in infrastructure project spend. Who are the winners and runners up in the GCC project stakes right now?

Citigroup’s latest MENA construction tracker report holds that the value of projects either delayed or cancelled rose to $170bn in August alone; a signal indication that the construction segment, particularly related to real estate in the Emirates, is still suffering from the fallout of local construction firms overstretching their credit exposure in the early years of this century. The figure is significant; the value of projects cancelled or delayed accounts for 56% of the all stymied projects across the survey area and is up 13% on July’s figures.  The property boom in the Emirates has now been languishing for over 3 years, with some prices of private property estimated to have fallen by as much as 60% in Dubai. No wonder many developers have been forced to abandon projects.

Projects cancelled or on hold across the wider MENA region in contrast, fell slightly to $1.69bn, compared with $1.7bn in July.  However, key markets in the GCC continue on the fast track in terms of new project spend. Saudi Arabia added $81bn worth of projects to the already $100bn it intends to spend on infrastructure in general and $20bn it will spend on downstream petrochemical projects over the coming five years.  Saudi Arabia, the UAE, also Jordan and Egypt are reportedly now pushing forward the idea of building nuclear power capacity across the MENA region; with the estimated value of projects topping $400bn over the next 15 years.  Saudi Arabia will again dominate this segment, with a planned $350bn spend on the King Abdullah City of Atomic and Renewable Energy project, which aims to establish a zeroCo2 emissions city using a mix of nuclear and other renewal energy sources.  Around 16 separate nuclear units are planned.



Kuwait ($20bn) and Qatar ($2bn) also have projects that are in preliminary stages of construction. In contrast, the UAE also showed a $12bn decline in preliminary projects to $118bn.

It is a contrasting picture with the situation even two years ago. While the outlook for countries such as Saudi Arabia look strong in the near term, revised data issued by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority shows that the build up to the current construction pipeline was rather slow in 2009 and the first half of 2010. There was an uptick in growth in 2010, with the industry posting 3.7% year-on-year real construction industry growth, while an average growth in construction projects of some 4% a year over the next four years is expected, backed by a healthy project pipeline, strong government support, an ability to invest and local demand for infrastructure keeps the industry stable.

The country’s Ninth Development Plan announced a touch over a year ago sets out an investment spend on infrastructure of some SAR1, 444bn ($385bn) between 2010 and 2014. Then, in response to stirrings elsewhere in MENA, now called the Arab Spring, the government created two packages of social benefits worth $130bn to finance further investment in education, healthcare and housing projects. SAR250bn ($66bn) was pledged for housing alone, with 500,000 new units in the pipeline. Around 7% of development plan investment will be channelled into housing, encompassing some 1m new houses to be built on a public-private partnership basis.  Another 19% will be invested in healthcare, involving the build of some 117 hospitals and 750 so-called primary care units.  The government also has an $80bn 10-year investment plan for electricity infrastructure underway in parallel with the infrastructure investment plans, which run out to 2018. Some 20GW of electricity capacity is currently under construction, worth around $30bn.

In a boost to local construction firms, the Saudi Industrial Development Fund has announced it will finance up to 75% of costs for investment projects in under-developed regions.

The current crop of investments underway includes the SAR40bn expansion of the Grand Mosque, underscoring the Kingdom’s pivotal role in Islam. The expansion, in the northern part of the Grand Mosque will cover an estimated 356,000 square metres, ultimately accommodating up to 1.2m worshippers.  It includes the construction of four giant bridges allowing access to the northern courtyards inside the Grand Mosque. It is the largest expansion project within the Grand Mosque complex to date and will showcase the country’s move into the 21st century, while retaining its sacred role as protector of the Islamic faith.

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