Friday 27th November 2015
NEWS TICKER, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH: In the last six months River and Mercantile Group (R&M) says has been appointed to design, execute and provide ongoing management of over £1.7bn of structured equity options mandates for pension clients, including the Royal Mail Pension Plan and another FTSE 100 company’s pension scheme. James Barham, global head of Distribution at R&M, says, "With increased volatility in equity markets, we have seen a growing number of clients that are taking advantage of our market leading derivative capabilities to manage the downside exposure in their equity portfolios. The derivatives team at R&M has an exceptional long term track record in designing and managing structured equity solutions for clients over the last ten years. We continue to see significant demand from pensions and institutional clients for structured equity to actively manage the profile of their equity investment returns while maintaining their allocation to equities. The design and execution of these mandate demonstrates R&M’s ability to design innovative, outcome oriented solutions for our clients, which are delivered to meet their governance requirements.” - Demand to borrow Asian stocks surged in the wake of the recent market volatility reports Markit. While short sellers have since pulled back slightly, the current demand to borrow shares across the region is still up by a fifth since the start of the year. Short interest across Asia is up by 18% year to date, reaching 2.7% of free float. However, says Markit, Japanese short selling has been relatively flat since the start of the year. The firm adds that consumer sectors have made Australia the most shorted country in the region - Trayport, a provider of energy trading solutions to traders and exchanges, says Power Solutions Enerji Ticaret ve Danışmanlık Anonim Şirketi has chosen Trayport’s GlobalVision Broker Trading SystemSM (BTS) for trading in the Turkish power market. Power Solutions, founded in Turkey in 2015, provides OTC Brokerage services in the Turkish electricity market.. The Trayport BTS offers brokers access to a growing network of traders using Trayport’s trading technology - The Dutch residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) market remained strong during the three-month period ended September 2015, according to the latest indices published by Moody's The 60+ day delinquencies of Dutch RMBS, including Dutch mortgage loans benefitting from a Nationale Hypotheek Garantie, continued to decrease to 0.73% in September 2015 from 0.81% in June 2015. The 90+ day delinquencies also continued to decrease to 0.56% in September 2015 from 0.64% in June 2015. Cumulative defaults increased to 0.78% of the original balance, plus additions (in the case of master issuers) and replenishments, in September 2015 from 0.70% in June 2015. This compares to cumulative defaults of 0.49% in September 2014. Cumulative losses increased to 0.15% in September 2015 from 0.14% in June 2015. Moody's has assigned definitive credit ratings to two new transactions since the last publication of the Index on September 9th, including five classes of notes issued by STORM 2015-II BV. and two classed of notes issued by Hypenn RMBS IV BV. As of the end of September, the 107 Moody's-rated Dutch RMBS transactions had an outstanding pool balance of €217.9bn, representing a year-over-year decrease of 4.8% - Thanksgiving holidays in the US has coloured trading today. In the Asia-Pac, low commodities prices are weighing on the Australian economy. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 gained 0.3% in thin trading volumes across the whole Asia-Pac region. With the exception of the Australian dollar, trading volumes were ridiculously small EUR/USD traded within a 10 pips range between 1.0615 and 1.0625. Similarly, GBP/USD traded sideways between 1.5115 and 1.5131. According to Yann Quelenn, market analyst at Swissquote: “When commodities price lower, there is a transfer of wealth between exporters (producers) and importers of commodities. The decline favours industries that need commodities as primary source for manufacturing products. Australia is on the exporters’ side. Indeed, an important part of the Australian’s revenues accounts for the revenues on the extraction of gold, silver, platinum and other metals. Materials shares fell 1.3%, and are down 4.6% so far this week, with commodities like copper and nickel having tumbled to multiyear lows. In Japan, The Nikkei Stock Average ended the day up 0.5% at 19944.41, while and South Korea's Kospi rose 1.1%. The Shanghai Composite Index fell 0.3% and Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index closed flat. Japan shares have posted one of the strongest rebounds in the region since September. The Nikkei is the second-best performing market in Asia year to date with a gain of 14%. China's Shenzhen Composite Index is up 65% year to date. The Straits Times Index (STI) ended 6.89 points or 0.24% lower to 2884.69, taking the year-to-date performance to -14.28%. The top active stocks today were OCBC Bank, which declined 0.91%, SingTel, which gained 0.26%, UOB, which declined 1.79%, DBS, which declined 0.36% and Global Logistic, with a 1.91% fall. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index declined 0.05%, while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index declined0.84%.In Brazil, the BCB left rates unchanged at 14.25% yesterday in spite of rampant inflation. The latest economic survey by the central bank showed that inflation expectations are not anchored yet as it is expected to reach 10.33% by year-end and 6.64% by the end of 2016. Broadly, expectations the U.S. Federal Reserve will raise interest rates in December has pushed the yen weaker. The currency has weakened 3.1% against the U.S. dollar in the past three months. Japan shares nevertheless remain vulnerable to global central bank moves and geopolitical tensions - The London Metal Exchange's three-month copper contract closed down 1.3% at $4,549 a metric ton on Wednesday. Copper last traded at $4,692.50 a metric ton, up from the opening price of $4,538 a ton on Thursday. Overnight, the latest U.S. report on jobless claims pointed to a strengthening employment picture, pushing the dollar higher. U.S. stocks ended mostly unchanged as consumer discretionary and health-care shares offset losses in other sectors on the last full trading day of the week before the Thanksgiving holiday. Brent oil futures fell 0.2% to $46.06 a barrel. US crude-oil futures rose 0.2% to $43.13 a barrel. Gold prices were up 0.3% at $1,073.50 a troy ounce.

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Is asset allocation undergoing a paradigm shift?

Monday, 05 March 2012
Is asset allocation undergoing a paradigm shift? Portfolios continue to maintain historically high levels of cash, as managers seek extra protection in the face of ongoing global economic uncertainty. That has not stopped profit-hungry investors from considering plausible alternatives to equities, and to date many continue to mine potential opportunities in the vast commodities arena. From Boston, Dave Simons reports.

Portfolios continue to maintain historically high levels of cash, as managers seek extra protection in the face of ongoing global economic uncertainty. That has not stopped profit-hungry investors from considering plausible alternatives to equities, and to date many continue to mine potential opportunities in the vast commodities arena. From Boston, Dave Simons reports.

It has been over three years since the onset of the credit crisis, yet the combination of market volatility and economic weakness continues to keep global investors guessing. Will there be a soft landing or another freefall? Can the global economy find workable solutions, or is sovereign-debt default just around the corner? These and other macro questions have done little to reassure participants; it no surprise, then, that many investors and corporate managers remain historically under-exposed to equities.

What are the alternatives though? Cash, typically little more than a short-term respite during bouts of extreme volatility, remains a zero-sum game (or even less than zero, once inflation is factored in). Similarly, paltry yields continue to offer income seekers little in the way of comfort, while a sudden economic rebound could spark a jump in interest rates and, in turn, a reduction in bond prices.

Given the circumstances, a realloc-ation into certain commodities assets appears to be a viable route. However, questions remain. How hazardous is the downside risk for commodities prices at this stage of the game? Will the un-certainty that has informed the markets fuel the trend toward commodities and other plausible alternatives, or, as recent movements within the US markets seem to suggest, will investors make a much stronger commitment to equities? Is there a case to be made for maintaining a much more balanced mix of assets within a portfolio at any given time?

A year-end poll by Reuters appeared to substantiate the notion that cash is still king. The survey of more than 50 global asset-management facilities found that portfolios were comprised of 6.6% cash on average—the highest such level in at least a year, according to the poll—as managers sought extra protection in the face of economic uncertainty stemming from the EU debt crisis and other macro concerns.
Meanwhile, corporations continued to raise cash largely for the purpose of funding M&A activity as well as buying back shares. Barring an unexpected economic tailwind, Christopher J Wolfe, managing director and chief investment officer for Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Private Banking and Investment Group, sees a continuation of this scenario, with businesses keeping costs in check while (at the same time) “accumulating cash and waiting for better days.”

Colin O SheaColin O'Shea, head of commodities for London-based Hermes Fund Managers. The mountain of cash that’s been sitting on the sidelines has been growing for the better part of a decade, remarks Nicholas Colas, chief market strategist for New York-based ConvergEx Group. “CFOs and boards of directors are well aware of the fragility of the financial system, and particularly since the start of the crisis there is this notion that as a large company you have to do everything you can to be your own bank. Unlike investors who can diversify portfolio risk and aren’t really concerned about the welfare of any single company, CFOs have their reputations at stake—and in an effort to protect the franchise during times of uncertainty, they tend to hold higher levels of cash.”

In the US, the situation has been exacerbated by years of low productivity and feeble economic growth. Accord-ingly, the ability for companies to invest capital has itself declined, says Colas. “Compared to the 1970s, 1980s and even the tech-boom1990s, we just haven’t seen the kind of incremental wealth creation that paves the way for bigger markets.” US-based chief financial off-icers have tended to look overseas for growth explains Colas, “or just haven’t made any moves at all.”

Andreas Utermann, global chief investment officer for global asset-management firm RCM, agrees that the precariousness of the European debt situation and the possible impact on the global financial system calls for a more defensive posture. Accordingly, RCM continues to underweight financials, but will be prepared to make adjustments, says Utermann, “should conditions improve and/or bond spreads in the EMU periphery decrease.”

Commodities alternative
Continuing market uncertainty hasn’t stopped profit-hungry investors from seeking plausible alternatives to equities, and to date many continue to look for opportunities within the vast reaches of the commodities sector. With good reason: relative to equities, commodities have generally offered historically competitive returns, while serving as an inflationary hedge as well.

Federal Reserve Bank chairman Ben Bernanke’s pledge to leave interest rates alone for the better part of two years was music to the ears of gold mavens, who have watched gold prices recently rebound as real rates remained in negative territory. Gold has been the commodity of choice for the likes of Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, while UBS analyst Edel Tully called for a price target of $2,500/oz before year’s end.
“Commodities continue to be attractive proposition for those seeking a properly diversified portfolio mix,” offers Colin O'Shea, head of commodities for London-based Hermes Fund Managers. “Another consideration is the historically low correlation between commodities and bonds as well as other fixed-income assets.” Particularly over the last several years, commodities have yielded a positive risk premium over equities, and have also exceeded the risk premiums of many pension-plan liabilities during the same period, says O’Shea.

Though it maintains reduced materials exposures, RCM is currently overweight energy commodities. “Longer-term, we remain positively orientated on commodities, given the significant pent-up demand in developing nations, supply constraints and the negative real interest environment created by many central banks globally,” says Utermann.

Perhaps more importantly, com-modities serve as a safeguard against event risk, proving invaluable to investors particularly in the perpetually volatile energy sector. At present, conditions in the Middle East and other regions are such that, even in the face of relatively soft demand, a significant spike in the price of oil remains a very real possibility.  “A major oil-price shock resulting from these geopolitical elements would not bode well for equities,” concurs O’Shea. “Given this scenario, it certainly makes a lot of sense for investors to look for viable opportunities to achieve ade-quate portfolio protection.”

The downside is that the perceived supply risk is overblown, prices begin to fall and, with risk premia lowered, investors suddenly go on an extended equities shopping spree.

“The floor is likely no lower than $90,” says O’Shea, “which is largely due to these regions having to re-set their minimum pricing requirements based on the political events of the past year.”

Nicholas ColasNicholas Colas, chief market strategist for New York-based ConvergEx Group. Even if the current cash stash winds up being re-directed into equities, commodities will likely be none the worse for wear, says O’Shea. “There may be some short-term impact in response to equity investment flows, should that occur,” he says. “However, the underlying supply-demand drivers are what ultimately dictate price, and they remain solid. So yes, I think volume would fluctuate and we could see some price movement as well, but a correction would likely be limited to re-adjusted market fundamentals.”

Because of their historically low correlation to financials, commodities have been attractive to asset owners. However, within the last year or so non-correlative strategies have been harder to come by, notes Colas, com-modities included.

“Over a three, five, and ten year perspective, those low correlations are still intact,” says Colas, “but as more people use commodities as an asset class that has begun to change.” Even gold, which typically moves at opp-osing angles from any financial asset, has recently shown monthly cor-relations in the 50% to 60% range versus US stock. So while commodities will likely continue to gain traction, some of their inherent appeal has been diminished as correlations increase.  “Lack of correlation really has been the raison d'etre for keeping commodities in one’s portfolio,” says Colas. “I mean, why else would you want to own a warehouse full of copper?”

Having said that, there are less-obvious reasons for maintaining one’s commodities connection.  “While it is somewhat more nuanced, the fact that commodities cannot be manufactured by a central bank is in and of itself a compelling enough argument for some investors,” explains Colas.

In a complex world where most other investments are inexorably linked to central bank policymaking, theo-retically a warehouse full of copper should appreciate at or beyond the going inflation rate. “For all the things the Fed can control, the fact is they can’t produce an ounce of copper. It’s like an old master painting—it doesn’t matter how much money the Fed pumps into the financial system, there are still a fixed number of old masters. In reality, there is an increasingly vocal branch of the investment world that thinks you should just be long anything the central banks can’t make.”

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