Friday 3rd July 2015
NEWS TICKER: THURSDAY, JULY 2nd 2015: Deutsche Börse says a new iShares ETF from BlackRock's product offering has been launched on Xetra and Börse Frankfurt today. The iShares MSCI EMU USD Hedged UCITS ETF launched on Xetra ETF provides access to euro-zone equities with currency hedging against US dollar. The exchange organisation says the ETF enables investors to participate in the performance of stock corporations in the euro zone while also benefiting from currency hedging against the US dollar. This protects investors against an appreciation of the US dollar against the euro. - The Straits Times Index (STI) ended 3.3 points or 0.1% lower to 3327.84, taking the year-to-date performance to -1.11%. The top active stocks today were UOB, which gained 0.82%, DBS, which closed unchanged, Singtel, which declined 0.24%, CapitaLand, which declined 1.13% and Global Logistic, with a 0.78% fall. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index declined 0.06%, while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index rose 0.02%. The outperforming sectors today were represented by the FTSE ST Basic Materials Index, which rose 0.82%. The two biggest stocks of the Index - Midas Holdings and NSL- ended 1.59% higher and 0.67% lower respectively. The underperforming sector was the FTSE ST Real Estate Investment Trusts Index, which slipped 0.67%. CapitaLand Mall Trust shares declined 2.30% and Ascendas REIT declined 2.41% - According to Flightglobal, China’s state aviation supplier has tentatively signed for up to 75 Airbus A330s in an agreement which will help bridge a production gap to the re-engined A330neo. General terms of the agreement inlcude an order for 45 jets plus a memorandum of understanding for another 30 options. The deal took place during an official visit to France by Chinese premier Li Keqiang. Airbus has long been negotiating the landmark agreement following a preliminary deal to establish an A330 completion centre in Tianjin. The pact with China Aviation Supplies Holding, which is likely to include several aircraft configured in the lower-weight regional version. Meanwhile, Airbus CEO Fabrice Bregier says the package is a “new vote of confidence” in the twinjet. “China is today the most important market for aviation in the world,” he adds - Morningstar has upgraded the Royal London UK Equity Income fund to a Morningstar Analyst Rating of Silver. The fund was previously rated Bronze. Experienced manager Martin Cholwill has, over his decade-long tenure on the fund, consistently applied his proven investment process to good effect. His strategy is sensible for delivering yield and competitive total returns for investors, with a focus on free cash flows and valuations. The fund also enjoys a cost advantage over its rivals, with ongoing charges lower than the category norm. These factors have led to a strong and consistent performance profile over a number of years - The amount of outstanding Euro commercial paper (CP) and certificates of deposit (CD) declined significantly in the week ending July 1st, according to CMDPortal data. Outstandings dropped by $11.80bn to $861.59bn during the week. Sovereign, supranational and agency CP outstandings dropped by $2.80bn to $219.44bn. Corporate CP outstandings declined the most during the week by $5.56bn to $89.83bn. Meanwhile financial CP outstandings declined by $3.04bn to $503.37bn - SWIFT says that BTG Pactual, one of Latin America’s largest financial services firms, has joined the Know Your Customer (KYC) Registry, a centralised repository that maintains a standardised set of information about correspondent banks required for KYC compliance. For the KYC Registry, banks contribute an agreed ‘baseline' set of data and documentation for validation by SWIFT, which the contributors can then share with their counterparties. Each bank retains ownership of its own information, as well as control over which other institutions can view it - Laurel Powers-Freeling is to join the board of Atom, the UK’s newest bank, as its senior independent non-executive director. The appointment comes hot on the heels of Atom’s announcement that the Prudential Regulation Authority and the Financial Conduct Authority have approved its digital business model. Powers-Freeling was recently appointed as Chairman of Sumitomo-Mitsui Banking Corporation Europe - China has guaranteed that 100% foreign-owned firms (typically known as WFOEs – Wholly Foreign-Owned Entities) will be able to manufacture and market their own products for sale to mainland clients, operating under exactly the same rules as local private funds. The announcement comes at the end of the US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue, which appears to have resulted in unprecedented rights for foreign firms participating in China’s financial markets. Greater access to China’s Interbank Bond (IBB) market has also been granted, with the elimination of firm-level ownership quotas in addition to improved access and operating rights for foreign banks. Finally, Shanghai’s Free Trade Zone (FTZ) has been specified as the testing ground where foreign owners can establish wholly-owned futures companies with access rights to domestic exchanges. China’s opening-up to foreign asset managers is now moving faster than our most optimistic predictions. With that speed in mind, we predict that all of the above opportunities will be available to foreign owners by the end of 2015.

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Volcker Rule likely delayed until after US presidential elections

Monday, 16 April 2012
Volcker Rule likely delayed until after US presidential elections As mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act, the Volcker Rule—named for its author, former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker—prohibits commercial banks from using their own capital to invest in hedge funds and private equity funds, unless such activity is deemed “systemically important” (that is, is related to market making, securitisation, hedging, and/or risk management) and is limited to a three-percent ownership stake. With nary a fan on either side of the pond, the much-maligned Volcker Rule could be ripe for modification—though any change is more likely to happen later than sooner. David Simons reports. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

As mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act, the Volcker Rule—named for its author, former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker—prohibits commercial banks from using their own capital to invest in hedge funds and private equity funds, unless such activity is deemed “systemically important” (that is, is related to market making, securitisation, hedging, and/or risk management) and is limited to a three-percent ownership stake. With nary a fan on either side of the pond, the much-maligned Volcker Rule could be ripe for modification—though any change is more likely to happen later than sooner. David Simons reports.

Regulators had hoped to have the Volcker Rule finalised by mid-July. However, ironing out the increasingly complex proposal—which includes newly added exemptions needed to placate the bill’s many opponents—will likely take much longer.

Retiring Massachusetts congressman Barney Frank, head of the House Financial Services Committee and co-author of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act, has suggested something of a compromise; that regulators work towards completing a simplified version of the law by early September. "The agencies [have] tried to accommodate a variety of views on the implementation,” says Frank, “but the results reflected in the proposed rule are far too complex, and the final rules should be simplified significantly.”



Financial institutions may be struggling to regain public trust in the wake of the 2008 credit meltdown; however that has not stopped officials from taking aim at the proposed Volcker legislation during the SEC’s comment period which closed on February 13th. Speaking on behalf of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA), Tim Ryan, SIFMA’s president and chief executive officer called the proposed regulations “unworkable” and “not faithful to Congressional intent”. Moreover, Ryan says they will have negative consequences for US financial markets and the economy.

Echoing a common theme among Volcker critics, Ryan contends that the new law could result in drastically reduced market liquidity for investors, and make it more difficult for companies to raise capital. SIFMA’s five-part comment letter includes proposed modifications to proprietary trading restrictions and hedge fund/private-equity fund investment activity under Volcker, and expresses concern over Volcker’s impact on municipal securities and global securitisation.

Like almost everything else drafted by the Obama White House, the Volcker Rule has virtually no support in the GOP, and includes among its detractors Daniel Gallagher and Troy Paredes, the two Republican members of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Speaking at an Institute of International Bankers conference held in Washington last month, Gallagher suggested that regulators re-examine their initial efforts and, if necessary, “go back to the drawing board to make sure we regulate wisely, rather than just quickly.”

Not that all of the criticisms have had political overtones. An exception to the rule allowing US banks to continue trading treasuries and municipal bonds has drawn fire from state and local government agencies, which have demanded that they receive the same exemption. The Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB), the US-based firm charged with protecting investor interest in the municipal-securities space, has urged regulators to expand the rule’s proprietary trading exemptions to include municipal-bond brokers. It’s an effort to avoid “bifurcation” within the municipal securities market, says MSRB, warning current exemptions “are not useful in the municipal securities market,” and unless modified will “prevent a free and open market from prevailing.”

Nor has Volcker venting been limited to the US. In a comment letter issued in February, the European Fund and Asset Management Association (EFAMA), the representative association for Europe’s investment-management community, argued that exemptions favouring US institutions pose a serious threat to European funds due to the potential shift in the balance of power. Accordingly, regulators should take the necessary steps to prevent any negative impact on liquidity and operational efficiency abroad, said the group.

Meanwhile, Oregon’s Democratic Senator Jeff Merkley, who along with Senator Carl Levin of Michigan helped draft some of the Volcker provisions, bristled at suggestions that substantial modifications would be required. If anything, said Merkley, the rule needs to be tougher, though not “as vague or complex as regulators are making it.” Also in favour of a stronger Volcker is former Citigroup chief executive officer John S Reed, who has argued that in its present form the rule “does not offer bright enough lines or provide strong enough penalties for violation."

Having made regulatory reform one of its chief priorities, the Obama administration is unlikely to cede any ground in the months leading up to the US presidential elections in November. Hence, even the most vocal of Volcker opponents admit that change is unlikely to happen until after the new Congress convenes in January of next year.

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