Tuesday 28th July 2015
NEWS TICKER, Monday July 27th: The Spanish Mercado Alternativo Bursátil (MAB) has admitted INCLAM to list on the market’s growth company segment. The company will trade from July 29th this year. Its trading code will be INC and trading will be through a price setting mechanism which will match buy and sell orders by means of two daily auction periods or “fixings”, at 12 hrs and at 16 hrs. Stratelis Advisors is acting as registered adviser and MG Valores SV as liquidity provider. - Moody's: Al Khalij Commercial Bank (al khaliji) Q.S.C.'s asset quality and capital strengths moderated by high reliance on market funding. Al Khalij Commercial Bank (al khaliji) Q.S.C. (AKB) benefits from a solid overall financial profile which is moderated by high reliance on market funding and concentration risks, says Moody's Investors Service in the report "Al Khalij Commercial Bank (al khaliji) Q.S.C: asset quality and capital strengths are moderated by high reliance on market funding" - While German SME’s continue to be plagued by recruiting problems, according to a new KfW survey fewer are bothered about filling employment vacancies than they were back in 2010. More women and older people in the working population, increasing labour mobility and the rise in skilled labour from other EU countries is helping filling the employment gap. Even so, the survey suggests that over the longer term, skilled labour shortages could be the order of the day – In a filing with the Luxembourg Stock Exchange Bank Nederlandse Gemeenten has given notice of amended final terms to the holders of TRY77.5m notes at 10.01% due June 17th 2025 (ISIN Code: XS1247665836 and Series no. 1214) issued under the bank’s €80bn debt issuance programme. The amendment includes provision that the issuer may settlement any payment due in respect of the notes in a currency other than that specified on the due date subject to pre-agreed conditions. Deutsche Bank London is the issuing and paying agent, while Deutsche Bank Luxembourg is listing agent, paying agent and transfer agent. The Shanghai Composite Index ended down 8.5% at 3725.56, its second-straight day of losses and worst daily percentage fall since February 27th, 2007. China's main index is up 6% from its recent low on July 8, but still off 28% from its high in June. The smaller Shenzhen Composite fell 7% to 2160.09 and the small-cap ChiNext Closed 7.4%. Lower at 2683.45. The drop comes as investors wonder how long the government’s buying of blue chip stocks can last. Clearly, the government can’t be seen to be pouring good money after bad to prop up what looks to be a failed strategy of propping up the market. Disappointing corporate earnings data across the globe has affected Asia’s main indices in today’s trading. The Hang Seng Index fell 2.7%. Australia's S&PASX 200 was down 0.2%, the Nikkei Stock Average fell 1% and South Korea's Kospi was off 0.4%. Turnover also remains depressed on Chinese exchanges, with around RMB1.2trn the average volume traded, compared to more than RMB2trn before this current downturn – In other news from the Asia Pacific, New Zealand’s Financial Markets Authority (FMA) has issued a Stop Order against Green Gardens Finance Trust Limited (GGFT) and warns the public to be wary of doing business or depositing money with this company. The Stop Order prohibits GGFT from offering, issuing, accepting applications for or advertising debt securities and/or accepting further contributions, investments or deposits for debt securities – Meantime, in Australia, the Federal Court has found that Astra Resources PLC (Astra Resources) and its subsidiary, Astra Consolidated Nominees Pty Ltd (Astra Nominees), breached the fundraising provisions of the Corporations Act, as part of civil proceedings brought by ASIC. In his judgment, Justice White upheld ASIC's claims that Astra Resources and Astra Nominees breached the Corporations Act by raising funds from investors without a prospectus or similar disclosure document, as required under the law.

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Investors pile into Islamic bonds

Wednesday, 23 May 2012
Investors pile into Islamic bonds April and May looked to be banner months for sukuk. Two deals, one from the Saudi Electricity Company (SEC) and the other, from Banque Saudi Fransi, the Saudi lender part-owned by Credit Agricole, marked two rare but popular US dollar denominated issues which were highly prized by investors. The benchmark deals helped underscore growing investor appetite for Islamic bonds. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

April and May looked to be banner months for sukuk. Two deals, one from the Saudi Electricity Company (SEC) and the other, from Banque Saudi Fransi, the Saudi lender part-owned by Credit Agricole, marked two rare but popular US dollar denominated issues which were highly prized by investors. The benchmark deals helped underscore growing investor appetite for Islamic bonds.

Saudi Fransi, Saudi Arabia’s fifth largest bank, launched $750m five-year Islamic bond mid-month at par amid strong investor demand for the issue in mid-May. The issue is the bank’s first sukuk sale under a recently-established $2bn debt programme. The sukuk came in at a spread of 185 basis points (bps) over midswaps, at the lower end of its ­indicated range. Initial price guidance was 200bps over midswaps. The deal was heavily oversubscribed, attracting investor orders worth $4bn, under­scoring growing investor appetite for sukuk issuance. The sukuk carries a profit rate of 2.947%. Citi, Deutsche Bank and Credit Agricole were arrangers on the deal.

The deal marks the second dollar denominated sukuk emanating from the Kingdom so far this year. Saudi Electricity’s $1.75bn sukuk, issued three weeks earlier, raised the bar with some $17.5bn in investor orders.  The Saudi Electricity Company (SEC), which is rated A1/AA-/AA- all Stable, is the largest utility in the GCC. The issue was made up of a five year $500m tranche and a $1.25bn ten year element. The ­transaction was led by Deutsche Bank and HSBC marked the inaugural ­international sukuk issuance by SEC and the largest international debt capital markets issuance out of Saudi Arabia for some years. The issuer also wanted to achieve a long tenor bond supported by a diversified investor base, which the arrangers helped secure after a comprehensive global road show. The dual-tranche Sukuk transaction was well received globally and generated a large order book with over 440 investors placing orders.



Shortly after the issue the SEC’s chief executive Ali Al Barrak explained, “The sukuk issue is important to us for strengthening our funding mix, accessing longer-tenor financing, broadening our investor base and helping us become more in line with our global peers while supporting SEC’s capital expenditure requirements.”

Saudi Arabian dollar-denominated bonds come to market relatively infrequently, and attract substantial demand when they do; illustrating that Gulf issuers are benefiting from their own economic micro-climate and are providing something of an oasis for investors starved of comprehensive corporate issuance opportunities. 

Investor appetite for the deals was marked and might just be a sign of a growing preference for Islamic instruments. The evidence is still thin: however Banque Saudi Fransi’s existing $650m conventional bond, which carries interest of 4.5% and matures in 2015, was bid at just over 103.97 in the second week of May, to yield about 2.8%, coming under some selling pressure ahead of the new issue.

Also in mid May Islamic Development Bank (IDB) enhanced the size of its medium term notes (NTN) ­programme from $1.5bn to $3.5bn, which will be issued in both London and Kuala Lumpur. The IDB’s forthcoming medium term sukuk (which is expected to range between five and seven years) will be issued under this programme sometime in June and is expected to raise between $750m and $1bn. Funds will be used to provide blended credits in support of capital goods projects in member countries. IDB, which is AAA-rated, priced a $750m five-year sukuk last May at a spread of 35bps over midswaps to yield 2.35%. According to local Saudi press reports, the sukuk will be 144a-compliant and, therefore, open to investors from the United States; though the IDB did not respond to questions about its forthcoming issue. 

Elsewhere, bond traders expect the first restructuring of an Islamic bond.  United Arab Emirates’ Dana Gas, the Sharjah-based energy company, is expected to restructure its $920m sukuk in coming weeks as investor concerns have heightened over the ability of the utility to meet its payment ­commitments. Up to now no Islamic bonds have been renegotiated though there have been examples of outright defaults (in both Saudi Arabia and Kuwait).

Dana has reportedly hired Blackstone, Latham Watkins and Deutsche Bank to advise on the various options for repaying the sukuk. The company is “committed to finding a consensual solution that is equitable to all stakeholders”, it said in a statement to the Dubai stock exchange.

Meantime, the Central Bank of Bahrain (CBB) says its monthly issue of the short-term Islamic leasing bonds, Sukuk Al-Ijaara, has been oversubscribed by 175%. Subscriptions worth BD35mwere received for the BD20m issue, which carries a maturity of 182 days. The expected return on the issue, which matures in mid-November 2012, is 1.34%.

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