Tuesday 26th May 2015
NEWS TICKER: TUESDAY, MAY 26th: The National Settlement Depository (NSD), Russia’s central securities depository, today announced that Alexander Nazarov has been appointed director of research and development Department. Nazarov will be coordinating the issues of product range development and NSD service improvement. His new responsibilities will also include developing the company’s correspondent and international relations - The UK’s Personal Finance Society (PFS) has called for greater control of non-regulated savings and investment activity, by bringing it under ‘the same umbrella’ as regulated advice. PFS chief executive, Keith Richards, said there needs to be greater clarity in the mind of consumers, on the distinction between regulated investment advice and non-regulated activities. The value of bridging loans written in the year ended March 2015 have grown by almost a half on last year’s results, according to Association of Short Term Lenders ASTL's quarterly figures - The UK’s Association of Short Term Lenders (ASTL) has revealed in its quarterly figures that £2.35bn worth of loans were written by members in the year ended March 2015, where the overall loan book expanded by 43%compared to the same period in 2014. While bridging loan applications are still increasing with a 29% year-on-year rise, the figures showed that the pace has slowed from 63% growth. A 19% drop from Q4 2015 to the first quarter of this year was also highlighted, albeit “not considered to be a concern” – According to press reports, Richard Pyman has taken a leave of absence from his role as Chief Executive Officer at Shawbrook Bank due to illness. Pyman, who was appointed as CEO of the challenger bank in April 2014 after joining the group two years before, is taking temporary leave from his role after following medical advice. Pyman’s leave of absence was announced just as the group released its Q1 2015 results; and the bank began to bed down the proceeds from its early-April IPO, which raised £90m. Tom Wood, the lender’s Chief Financial Officer, will be filling in for Richard during his absence as interim Chief Executive Officer, while still continuing his normal role with support from Stephen Johnson - Cordea Savills, the international property investment manager has sold Erneside Shopping Centre, Enniskillen, Northern Ireland on behalf of a corporate pension fund client for £34.25m. The 163,000 sq ft shopping centre comprises 34 retail units and 666 car parking spaces. It is located in the centre of Enniskillen, the largest town in the region, and the dominant retail location. The centre, which is more than 97% let by floor area, is anchored by Marks & Spencer and Next which is currently being extended to include both their fashion and homeware formats. The asset was acquired by the Fund in 1995 and has evolved with two comprehensive phases of extension and remodelling in 1998-2000 and 2006-2008 -

A streamlined approach

Friday, 15 June 2012
A streamlined approach The European asset management industry has grown considerably over the last ten years. Assets under management (AUM) stood at €3trn at the end of 2001, and had reached €7.89trn by the end of the second quarter (Q2) 2011. This growth, which will support the savings and retirement of a large portion of the European population, means asset managers have an enormous responsibility to their end clients. By Ann Doherty and Brian Coughlin, JP Morgan Worldwide Securities Services (WSS). http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

The European asset management industry has grown considerably over the last ten years. Assets under management (AUM) stood at €3trn at the end of 2001, and had reached €7.89trn by the end of the second quarter (Q2) 2011. This growth, which will support the savings and retirement of a large portion of the European population, means asset managers have an enormous responsibility to their end clients. By Ann Doherty and Brian Coughlin, JP Morgan Worldwide Securities Services (WSS).

It is inevitable that asset managers want to retain their investment gains by reducing uncertainty and risk from their activities as much as possible and increase straight through processing (STP) and transparency, particularly in today’s volatile environment. One way to achieve that is to use a custodian that can provide all of these benefits through a streamlined product offering to help reduce both costs and risks while keeping up with the ever-

changing regulatory environment.



The objectives of asset managers present their own challenges, particularly with a regulatory reform agenda framed by G20 commitments, which culminated in the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform Act and the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR). Since 2008, regulation has been constantly evolving and expanding. In addition to those two regulations, investors also have to adjust to the second iteration of the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID II), UCITs IV, AIFMD, FATCA, Basel III and Solvency II.

To understand and execute on what regulators expect from them, asset managers today look to their service provider for help with the provision of an industry-leading  global custody and securities services offering with innovative technology to meet their daily requirements; seamless execution to increase STP and reduce risk; thought leadership to help them understand how regulation and potential market events could affect them (as well as their end-clients) and provide appropriate and timely data analysis.

Inevitably, the most sophisticated asset managers want to work with a securities services provider that can provide global reach and which has sufficient resources of capital to invest in industry-leading systems and technology. That means all of their requirements are met in one place. Investors then benefit and can have confidence in the fact that whatever complexity is injected into the market, whether by unexpected market events or by regulators, their custodian will be able to manage it.

Next, asset managers want seamless execution to help them eliminate risk and costs. Recognising the important role that asset managers play in the savings and pensions industry, regulators are putting pressure on them to provide their end clients with transpar­ency and as little risk as possible.  To do that, fund managers must tighten up the chain in their post-trade activities. 

For their part, custodians have been moving into more consultative technology-driven services for years, which asset managers and other users of custodian and related securities services have greatly benefitted from. Increasingly, these users of securities services are looking to their providers to move even closer to their front office, even coming just after the trading and investment decision. 

In the past, using one firm’s investment bank to execute trades and using the same bank’s custodian arm might have raised concerns about whether this one-stop-shop provided the best execution and cost in the market. ­Regulations, particularly MiFID, have removed that uncertainty.

Finding a provider that can tick the first two boxes as well as provide the critical consultative thought leadership all asset managers look for to keep up with regulatory and market changes, isn’t easy. Asset managers look to their service providers to provide ­information about changes arising from the rapidly evolving regulatory environment, to ensure that new requirements are understood and ­prepared for. Large international firms that are present in multiple jurisdictions are best placed to have a view of regulatory changes and to adapt their services to new requirements on a global basis.

Lastly, asset managers also rely on service providers to help them provide up-to-date and transparent data ­analysis, which is a critical reporting requirement to regulators, governments, trustees and other stakeholders, and is part of their own internal risk reviews.

This means asset managers want detailed information about their ­transactions, securities held, and ­breakdown of the core characteristics of those assets. They also want this data delivered in a fast and efficient manner, which requires a strong STP framework. This presents a challenge and an opportunity for service providers as it is not an easy task pulling together different sets of data and presenting it in a format that asset managers can consume and customise.

To meet all of these requirements, a service provider has to continuously invest in technology, and have ­regu­latory experts who can quickly analyse new regulations and understand how they will fit and potentially impact existing regulations with which asset managers are already complying. This re­quires a delicate balance between investing in business enhancements and people, while maintaining required capital levels. Large global custodians with the capacity to invest in its technology and systems are more able to make these investments than smaller firms.  

Asset managers are looking to ­securities services providers to act more strategically then ever before. By using one bank for all activities following the investment decision, asset managers are recognising their ability to cut potentially weak links from their post-trade chain, and rationalise the number of providers they use. This coordinated servicing effort across a firm, usually a bank, enables the large and fully-integrated players to really understand an asset manager’s needs, requirements, product and geo­graphical expansion plans. This support across many distribution channels helps fund managers reduce cost,

outsource the risk by leveraging ­operational cap­abilities, risk management capabilities and therefore offers a much better and broader value proposition. Today, a service provider must have all the ­necessary tools in the tool box and be willing and able to use them.

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