Sunday 25th January 2015
FRIDAY, JANUARY 23RD 2015: European markets regulator ESMA has added Athens Exchange Clearing House to its list of authorised CCPs under the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR). EMIR requires EU-based CCPs to be authorised and non-EU CCPs to be recognised in the European Union (EU). The updated list of authorised CCPs is available on ESMA's website - Driven by strengthening private domestic demand, economic growth in the US is expected to accelerate modestly this year and drag last year’s unspectacular housing activity upward, according to Fannie Mae’s Economic & Strategic Research (ESR) Group. Amid continued low gasoline prices, a firming labour market conditions, rising household net worth, improving consumer and business confidence, and reduced fiscal headwinds, the economy is expected to climb to 3.1% in 2015, up from the Group’s estimate of 2.7% in the prior forecast. The stronger economic backdrop should lead to improving income prospects, underpinning a higher rate of household formation in 2015. "Our theme for the year, Economy Drags Housing Upward, implies that both housing and the economy will pick up some speed in 2015, but that the economy will grow at a faster pace," says Fannie Mae chief economist Doug Duncan. "We have revised upward our full-year economic growth forecast to 3.1% for 2015, which is not yet robust but still an improvement over last year’s growth. Consumer spending should continue to strengthen due in large part to lower gas prices, giving further support to auto sales and manufacturing. We believe this will motivate the Federal Reserve to begin measures to normalize monetary policy in the third quarter of this year, continuing at a cautiously steady pace into 2016 and 2017, likely keeping interest rates relatively low for some time." - The Russian Central bank said yesterday that its gold reserves grew by a 600,000 ounces (18.7 tonnes) in December – the ninth successive month of gold reserve increases. Russia has now more than tripled its gold reserves in the past ten years. The ruble has fallen in value by almost 50% in the past 12 months which makes the nation’s gold reserves ever more important to its global economic status – According to LuxCSD the Taiwan Depository and Clearing Corporation (TDCC) has announced, effective Sunday (January 25th) the firm’s BIC will change from TDCCTWT1 to TDCCTWTP. Customers should quote the TDCC's new BIC in field 95P::PSET//TDCCTWTP of their settlement instructions – Moody's today upgraded the Corporate Family Rating (CFR) of Stabilus S.A. to B1 from B2 and the Probability of Default Rating (PDR) to B1-PD from B2-PD. At the same time the rating agency upgraded the instrument ratings assigned to the Senior Secured Notes issued by Servus Luxembourg Holding S.C.A. to B1 from B2. The outlook on all ratings remains positive – The US Federal Reserve Bank of New York says its daily Fed Funds effective rate is now 0.12% (Low 0.30%, High 0.3125%) with four basis points of standard deviation - Vanguard Group, already the biggest mutual fund company in the world, has risen to second place as a provider of exchange-traded funds, says ETF.com—based on the success of its low-cost index funds, including ETFs. Boston-based State Street Global Advisors, has dropped from second to third. Even so, SSGA still has the largest ETF in the world, the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY | A-98) - The Straits Times Index (STI) ended +41.21 points higher or +1.22% to 3411.5, taking the year-to-date performance to +1.38%. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index gained +0.97% while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index gained +0.23%. The top active stocks were CapitaLand (+4.09%), DBS (+0.80%), SingTel (+0.76%), UOB (+0.72%) and Noble (-0.47%). The outperforming sectors today were represented by the FTSE ST Real Estate Holding and Development Index (+2.31%). The two biggest stocks of the FTSE ST Real Estate Holding and Development Index are Hongkong Land Holdings (+1.18%) and Global Logistic Properties (+1.57%). The underperforming sector was the FTSE ST Oil & Gas Index, which gained +0.16% with Keppel Corp’s share price unchanged and Sembcorp Industries’s share price declining +0.93%. The three most active Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) by value today were the SPDR Gold Shares (+0.77%), IS MSCI India (+1.89%), DBXT MSCI Asia Ex Japan ETF (+1.57%) –

LME goes east

Tuesday, 24 July 2012
LME goes east In the latest manifestation of China’s rising economic power, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing (HKEX) has agreed to buy LME Holdings, the parent company of the London Metal Exchange, for £1.388bn, an eye-popping 58.3x net profits for 2011 even adjusting for a higher fee schedule implemented only on July 2nd this year. It is a trophy price for a trophy property: the largest base metals futures and options exchange in the world, with an estimated 80% market share. If the transaction receives shareholder and regulatory approval—not a racing certainty, given the unusual voting rights of LME shareholders—the new owners of a traditionally western capitalist bastion reflects the relentless eastward shift in capital flows, driven by China’s rapid economic growth. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

In the latest manifestation of China’s rising economic power, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing (HKEX) has agreed to buy LME Holdings, the parent company of the London Metal Exchange, for £1.388bn, an eye-popping 58.3x net profits for 2011 even adjusting for a higher fee schedule implemented only on July 2nd this year. It is a trophy price for a trophy property: the largest base metals futures and options exchange in the world, with an estimated 80% market share. If the transaction receives shareholder and regulatory approval—not a racing certainty, given the unusual voting rights of LME shareholders—the new owners of a traditionally western capitalist bastion reflects the relentless eastward shift in capital flows, driven by China’s rapid economic growth.

The imperative to secure ownership of the LME by Chinese entities will come as no surprise. The Middle Kingdom now accounts for 42% of global metals consumption; Chinese companies already trade on the LME through member firms; and several LME members have opened offices in Hong Kong. Newedge, whose 15% to 18% market share by volume makes it the largest LME ring-dealing member, even has a joint venture with Citic, the Chinese financial conglomerate, through which qualified customers can trade on the Shanghai Metals Exchange, the regional market for the same metals that dominate trading on the LME: ­aluminium, copper, zinc and lead.

John FayJohn Fay, global head of fixed income, currencies and commodities at Newedge.Shanghai still takes its opening cue from LME closing prices, but the relationship between the two exchanges has evolved into a two-way street—traders now track closing prices and trends in Shanghai before they set opening prices in London the next day. If the Shanghai market were to open up to foreign participants, John Fay, global head of fixed income, currencies and commodities at Newedge, expects overall trading volume would grow but does not see business migrating from London to Shanghai. “Liquidity moves to where the capital is created,” he says. “The markets in China will continue to grow, but it will be complementary to growth on the LME. It will be additional volume.”



Unlike other futures exchanges, LME operates three trading systems that work in parallel: a continuous electronic trading platform open 24/7, ring dealing sessions on the exchange floor, and OTC trades negotiated off the floor. No matter where trades take place, they are centrally cleared by LCH.Clearnet, at least for now. The LME plans to set up its own clearing house by 2014, an initiative HKEX supports and to which it can bring its own expertise in clearing (albeit not in commodities). Self-clearing will give the LME greater flexibility to launch new products and may enable the exchange to take as eligible collateral assets not acceptable to LCH.Clearnet for initial and/or variation margin.

The LME also offers a wider range of delivery dates than other futures exchanges: daily “prompt dates” out to three months, weekly out to six months, and thereafter monthly to 15, 27, 63 or 123 months forward depending on the metal. HKEX has committed to retain this structure at least until 2015, but Fay is keen to see it preserved in perpetuity. “It is the model our customers want because it is built for size or speed,” he says. “They want to go to the floor for price discovery and liquidity, to be able to trade electronically or over the counter (OTC), and they want it all cleared.”

The LME model is unique, but may not remain so. In fact, it offers a viable template for trading financial OTC derivatives on an exchange: the prompt date flexibility eliminates the mismatch between quarterly contract expiration dates and the dates to which commercial participants need to hedge. “The LME model is an answer to Dodd Frank,” says Fay.

HKEX intends to help the LME expand in Asia through a combination of enhanced data distribution, the introduction of futures contracts denominated in renminbi (RMB) and additional warehouses. LME operates a network of more than 600 licensed warehouses around the globe in which market participants can deposit ­deliverable material in exchange for a bearer warrant for the number of contract lots the metal represents at that location. None of the existing warehouses are in mainland China, however; Chinese companies typically deliver to warehouses in South Korea if need be, which is typically in times of tight supply.

Michael Overlander, chief executive of Sucden, a ring-dealing LME member that accounts for between 10% and 15% of trading volume, says past efforts to license warehouses in China have foundered on doubts about the rule of law in the country. If someone presented a bearer warrant to the warehouse at an inopportune moment, would the operator honour the obligation?

“In countries where the LME does have warehouses the warrant would never be questioned,” says Overlander. “I think fear of the unknown legalities has prevented the LME from putting warehouses on the ground in China.” Local warehouses would no doubt improve liquidity and attract more Chinese participants to the LME, but while HKEX can help the LME cut through bureaucratic red tape it may not be able to resolve the legal difficulty.

HKEX wants to leverage its existing renminbi-based trading and settlement infrastructure in Hong Kong to support new LME futures contracts denominated in the Chinese currency. Although these products would be another step toward the internationalisation of the renminbi, Overlander does not see them as an immediate precursor to free convertibility. “The Chinese government has shown a great reluctance to take the handcuffs off the RMB,” he says. “It will first have to relax the controls to get people excited about a currency with limited uses.”

Michael OverlanderMichael Overlander, chief executive of Sucden.Both Sucden and Newedge own shares in the LME but, at just under 3%, their holdings are far smaller than their market shares of exchange ­business. Maintaining the business model should be more important to both firms than the price at which they can sell LME shares, but few people are altogether immune to the lure of money. “I would be lying if I said the equity isn’t important,” says ­Overlander. “It would be hard to see the value of our shares topped in the foreseeable future. It was a relatively easy decision for us to support the transaction: we were satisfied with the buyer and the price.”

The losing bidders—Intercontinental Exchange and CME Group—must now explore alternatives if they wish to expand in base metals. For ICE, it would be a new business line, while CME has a copper contract traded on the Comex that competes directly with the LME. Apart from copper, CME has historically focused on precious metals—gold, silver, platinum and palladium—that do not overlap with LME products.

The LME’s dominant position represents a significant barrier to entry, however. Market participants have great confidence in price discovery on the LME, so much so that prices for physical contracts (which are not traded on the LME) are usually based on LME prices. The LME warehouse infrastructure would be hard to replicate too. “Virtually anywhere in the world, metal can be stored in exchange for a negotiable LME warrant. Warrant holders can have almost instant access to material on whatever day they want,” says Overlander. “The warehouse network is just one example. It would be tough to knock the LME off its pedestal.”

The reaction in some quarters to the LME sale—another British champion passes into foreign hands—may be more Sinophobic than xenophobic. Nobody claimed that American interests would interfere with price discovery in London when ICE bought the International Petroleum Exchange or NYSE Euronext took control of LIFFE. Chinese influence in London is likely to grow if Chinese companies do more business on the LME but ­Overland insists Chinese ownership will not affect market operations. “Whatever the rationale for buying the LME, it was not to manipulate prices in favour of Chinese buyers,” he says. “The LME will still have to comply with FSA rules that govern regulated investment exchanges, which are designed to make sure the market has the confidence of users.” 

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