Saturday 6th February 2016
NEWS TICKER: Friday, February 5th: According to Reuters, Venezuela's central bank has begun negotiations with Deutsche Bank AG to carry out gold swaps to improve the liquidity of its foreign reserves as it faces debt payments of some $9.5bn this year. Around 64% of Venezuela's $15.4bn reserves are held in gold bars, which in this fluid market impedes the central bank's ability to mobilise hard currency for imports or debt service. We called the central bank to confirm the story, but press spokesmen would not comment - The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) says official foreign currency reserves stood at $357bn (equivalent to seven times the currency in circulation or 48% of Hong Kong M3) as at the end of January, down compared with reserve assets of $358.8bn in December. There were no unsettled foreign exchange contracts at month end (end-December: $0.1bn) - BNP Paribas today set out plans to cut investment banking costs by 12% by 2019 to bolster profitability and reassure investors about the quality of its capital buffers. The bank is the latest in a line of leading financial institutions, including Credit Suisse, Barclays and Deutsche Bank which look to be moving away from capital intensive activities. BNP Paribas has been selling non-core assets and cutting back on operations including oil and gas financing for the last few years as it looks to achieve a target of 10% return on equity. Last year the bank announced a €900m write-down on its BNL unit in Italy, which pushed down Q4 net income down 51.7% to €665m - Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE)-listed tech company, Huge Group, will move its listing from the Alternative Exchange (AltX) to the JSE main board on March 1st - Moody's says it has assigned Aaa backed senior unsecured local-currency ratings to a drawdown under export credit provider Oesterreichische Kontrollbank's (OKB) (P)Aaa-rated backed senior unsecured MTN program. The outlook is negative in line with the negative outlook assigned to the Aaa ratings of the Republic of Austria, which guarantees OKB’s liabilities under the Austrian Export Financing Guarantees Act – As the first phase of talks between Greece and its creditors draws to an end, International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde stressed to journalists in Greece that debt relief is as important as the reforms that creditors are demanding, notably of the pension system. "I have always said that the Greek program has to walk on two legs: one is significant reforms and one is debt relief. If the pension [system] cannot be as significantly and substantially reformed as needed, we could need more debt relief on the other side." Greece's pension system must become sustainable irrespective of any debt relief that creditors may decide to provide, Lagarde said, adding that 10% of gross domestic product into financing the pension system, compared to an average of 2.5% in the EU, is not sustainable. She called for "short-term measures that will make it sustainable in the long term,” but did not outline what those measures might be. According to Eurobank in Athens, IMF mission heads reportedly met this morning with the Minister of Labour, Social Insurance and Social Solidarity, Georgios Katrougalos, before the team is scheduled to leave Athens today. According to the local press, it appears that differences exist between the Greek government and official creditors on the planned overhaul of the social security pension system. Provided that things go as planned, the heads are reportedly expected to return by mid-February with a view to completing the review by month end, or at worst early March. In its Winter 2016 Economic Forecast published yesterday, the European Commission revised higher Greece’s GDP growth forecast for 2015 and 2016 to 0.0% and -0.7%, respectively, from -1.4% and 1.-3% previously - Fitch says that The Bank of Italy's (BoI) recent designation of three banks as 'other systemically important institutions' (O-SIIs) has no impact on its ratings of the relevant mortgage covered bond (Obbligazioni Bancarie Garantite or OBG) programmes. Last month, BoI identified UniCredit, Intesa Sanpaolo. and Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena as Italian O-SIIs. Banco Popolare and Mediobanca have not been designated O-SIIs. This status is the equivalent of domestic systemically important bank status under EU legislation. Fitch rates two OBG programmes issued by UC and one issued by BMPS, which incorporates a one-notch Issuer Default Rating (IDR) uplift above the banks' IDRs. The uplift can be assigned if covered bonds are exempt from bail-in, as is the case with OBG programmes under Italy's resolution regime and in this instance takes account of the issuers' importance in the Italian banking sector – Meantime, according to local press reports, Italian hotel group Bauer and special opportunity fund Blue Skye Investment Group report they have completed the rescheduling and refinancing of Bauer’s €110m debt through the issue of new bonds and the sale of non-core assets, such as the farming business Aziende Agricole Bennati, whose sale has already been agreed, the Palladio Hotel & Spa and a luxury residence Villa F in Venice’s Giudecca island – Meantime, Russian coal and steel producer Mechel has also agreed a restructuring of its debt with credits after two intense years of talks. The mining company, is controlled by businessman Igor Zyuzin - Asian markets had a mixed day, coming under pressure. Dollar strengthening worries investors in Asia; from today’s trading it looks like dollar weakening does as well. Actually, that’s not the issue, the dollar has appreciated steadily over the last year as buyers anticipated Fed tightening; but it has hurt US exports and that has contributed to investor nervousness over the past few weeks, which is why everyone is hanging on today’s The nonfarm payrolls report, a bellwether of change – good or bad in the American economic outlook. Back to Asia. The Nikkei 225 ended the day at 16819.15, down 225.40 points, or 1.32%; and as the stock market fell the yen continued to strengthen. The Nikkei has shed 5.85% this week. The dollar-yen pair fell to the 116-handle, at 116.82 in afternoon trade; earlier this week, the pair was trading above 120. It is a hard lesson for the central bank, whose efforts to take the heat out of the yen by introducing negative interest rates has done nothing of the sort. Australia's ASX 200 closed down 4.15 points, or 0.08% after something of a mixed week. The index closed at 4976.20, with the financial sector taking most of the heat today, with the sector down 0.7%. In contrast, energy and materials sectors finished in positive territory, buoyed by gains in commodities. The Hang Seng Index closed at 19288.17, up 105.08 points (or 0.55%) while the Shanghai Composite was down 0.61%. down 17.07 points to 2763.95. The Shenzhen composite dropped 20.36 points (1.15%) to 1750.70, while the Kospi rose marginally by 0.08% to 1917.79. Today is the last day of trading on the Chinese exchanges for a week.

Latest Video

LME goes east

Tuesday, 24 July 2012
LME goes east In the latest manifestation of China’s rising economic power, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing (HKEX) has agreed to buy LME Holdings, the parent company of the London Metal Exchange, for £1.388bn, an eye-popping 58.3x net profits for 2011 even adjusting for a higher fee schedule implemented only on July 2nd this year. It is a trophy price for a trophy property: the largest base metals futures and options exchange in the world, with an estimated 80% market share. If the transaction receives shareholder and regulatory approval—not a racing certainty, given the unusual voting rights of LME shareholders—the new owners of a traditionally western capitalist bastion reflects the relentless eastward shift in capital flows, driven by China’s rapid economic growth. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

In the latest manifestation of China’s rising economic power, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing (HKEX) has agreed to buy LME Holdings, the parent company of the London Metal Exchange, for £1.388bn, an eye-popping 58.3x net profits for 2011 even adjusting for a higher fee schedule implemented only on July 2nd this year. It is a trophy price for a trophy property: the largest base metals futures and options exchange in the world, with an estimated 80% market share. If the transaction receives shareholder and regulatory approval—not a racing certainty, given the unusual voting rights of LME shareholders—the new owners of a traditionally western capitalist bastion reflects the relentless eastward shift in capital flows, driven by China’s rapid economic growth.

The imperative to secure ownership of the LME by Chinese entities will come as no surprise. The Middle Kingdom now accounts for 42% of global metals consumption; Chinese companies already trade on the LME through member firms; and several LME members have opened offices in Hong Kong. Newedge, whose 15% to 18% market share by volume makes it the largest LME ring-dealing member, even has a joint venture with Citic, the Chinese financial conglomerate, through which qualified customers can trade on the Shanghai Metals Exchange, the regional market for the same metals that dominate trading on the LME: ­aluminium, copper, zinc and lead.

John FayJohn Fay, global head of fixed income, currencies and commodities at Newedge.Shanghai still takes its opening cue from LME closing prices, but the relationship between the two exchanges has evolved into a two-way street—traders now track closing prices and trends in Shanghai before they set opening prices in London the next day. If the Shanghai market were to open up to foreign participants, John Fay, global head of fixed income, currencies and commodities at Newedge, expects overall trading volume would grow but does not see business migrating from London to Shanghai. “Liquidity moves to where the capital is created,” he says. “The markets in China will continue to grow, but it will be complementary to growth on the LME. It will be additional volume.”



Unlike other futures exchanges, LME operates three trading systems that work in parallel: a continuous electronic trading platform open 24/7, ring dealing sessions on the exchange floor, and OTC trades negotiated off the floor. No matter where trades take place, they are centrally cleared by LCH.Clearnet, at least for now. The LME plans to set up its own clearing house by 2014, an initiative HKEX supports and to which it can bring its own expertise in clearing (albeit not in commodities). Self-clearing will give the LME greater flexibility to launch new products and may enable the exchange to take as eligible collateral assets not acceptable to LCH.Clearnet for initial and/or variation margin.

The LME also offers a wider range of delivery dates than other futures exchanges: daily “prompt dates” out to three months, weekly out to six months, and thereafter monthly to 15, 27, 63 or 123 months forward depending on the metal. HKEX has committed to retain this structure at least until 2015, but Fay is keen to see it preserved in perpetuity. “It is the model our customers want because it is built for size or speed,” he says. “They want to go to the floor for price discovery and liquidity, to be able to trade electronically or over the counter (OTC), and they want it all cleared.”

The LME model is unique, but may not remain so. In fact, it offers a viable template for trading financial OTC derivatives on an exchange: the prompt date flexibility eliminates the mismatch between quarterly contract expiration dates and the dates to which commercial participants need to hedge. “The LME model is an answer to Dodd Frank,” says Fay.

HKEX intends to help the LME expand in Asia through a combination of enhanced data distribution, the introduction of futures contracts denominated in renminbi (RMB) and additional warehouses. LME operates a network of more than 600 licensed warehouses around the globe in which market participants can deposit ­deliverable material in exchange for a bearer warrant for the number of contract lots the metal represents at that location. None of the existing warehouses are in mainland China, however; Chinese companies typically deliver to warehouses in South Korea if need be, which is typically in times of tight supply.

Michael Overlander, chief executive of Sucden, a ring-dealing LME member that accounts for between 10% and 15% of trading volume, says past efforts to license warehouses in China have foundered on doubts about the rule of law in the country. If someone presented a bearer warrant to the warehouse at an inopportune moment, would the operator honour the obligation?

“In countries where the LME does have warehouses the warrant would never be questioned,” says Overlander. “I think fear of the unknown legalities has prevented the LME from putting warehouses on the ground in China.” Local warehouses would no doubt improve liquidity and attract more Chinese participants to the LME, but while HKEX can help the LME cut through bureaucratic red tape it may not be able to resolve the legal difficulty.

HKEX wants to leverage its existing renminbi-based trading and settlement infrastructure in Hong Kong to support new LME futures contracts denominated in the Chinese currency. Although these products would be another step toward the internationalisation of the renminbi, Overlander does not see them as an immediate precursor to free convertibility. “The Chinese government has shown a great reluctance to take the handcuffs off the RMB,” he says. “It will first have to relax the controls to get people excited about a currency with limited uses.”

Michael OverlanderMichael Overlander, chief executive of Sucden.Both Sucden and Newedge own shares in the LME but, at just under 3%, their holdings are far smaller than their market shares of exchange ­business. Maintaining the business model should be more important to both firms than the price at which they can sell LME shares, but few people are altogether immune to the lure of money. “I would be lying if I said the equity isn’t important,” says ­Overlander. “It would be hard to see the value of our shares topped in the foreseeable future. It was a relatively easy decision for us to support the transaction: we were satisfied with the buyer and the price.”

The losing bidders—Intercontinental Exchange and CME Group—must now explore alternatives if they wish to expand in base metals. For ICE, it would be a new business line, while CME has a copper contract traded on the Comex that competes directly with the LME. Apart from copper, CME has historically focused on precious metals—gold, silver, platinum and palladium—that do not overlap with LME products.

The LME’s dominant position represents a significant barrier to entry, however. Market participants have great confidence in price discovery on the LME, so much so that prices for physical contracts (which are not traded on the LME) are usually based on LME prices. The LME warehouse infrastructure would be hard to replicate too. “Virtually anywhere in the world, metal can be stored in exchange for a negotiable LME warrant. Warrant holders can have almost instant access to material on whatever day they want,” says Overlander. “The warehouse network is just one example. It would be tough to knock the LME off its pedestal.”

The reaction in some quarters to the LME sale—another British champion passes into foreign hands—may be more Sinophobic than xenophobic. Nobody claimed that American interests would interfere with price discovery in London when ICE bought the International Petroleum Exchange or NYSE Euronext took control of LIFFE. Chinese influence in London is likely to grow if Chinese companies do more business on the LME but ­Overland insists Chinese ownership will not affect market operations. “Whatever the rationale for buying the LME, it was not to manipulate prices in favour of Chinese buyers,” he says. “The LME will still have to comply with FSA rules that govern regulated investment exchanges, which are designed to make sure the market has the confidence of users.” 

Current Issue

Related News

Related Articles

Related Blogs

Related Videos