Friday 19th December 2014
NEWS TICKER: FRIDAY DECEMBER 19TH 2014: Scotiabank’s Commodity Price Index dropped -4.8% m/m in November (-6.1% yr/yr) and will end 2014 in a ‘deflationary’ mode, says economist Patricia Mohr. "Significant capacity expansion and the defence of market share by major oil and iron ore producers— against a backdrop of lacklustre world economic growth — account for the softness at the end of the year," she says. Mohr adds that the decision by Saudi Arabia not to reduce output to shore up international oil prices, but instead to allow prices to drop to levels curbing US shale development appears to be having a negative impact on confidence in a wide variety of other commodity as well as equity markets. She predicts prices will fall further this month, but will start to rebound in mid 201 - Jonathan Hill, the EU's financial-services commissioner, says he plans to pursue rules that separate a bank's proprietary trading from retail operations. "The sensible thing to do is to seek to make progress quickly" on the issue, Hill said. "There are still areas of risk in some of the biggest and most complicated banks,” reports Bloomberg- CME Group, said yesterday that it will change daily price limits in its CME Feeder Cattle futures effective today, pursuant to its emergency action authority. The current daily price limit for CME Feeder Cattle futures is $3.00 per hundredweight and will change to $4.50 per hundredweight effective on trade date December 18th Additionally, effective December 19th (tomorrow) these limits will have the ability to expand by 150% to $6.75 per hundredweight on any business day in the event that one of the first two contract months settles at limit on the previous trading day. CME Feeder Cattle futures have been locked limit for five consecutive days as a result of various factors. The change to daily price limits is necessary to ensure continued price discovery and risk transfer, says the CME. Daily price limits for CME Live Cattle futures will remain unchanged at $3.00 per hundredweight. Effective Friday, December 19th, these limits will have the ability to expand by 150 percent to $4.50 per hundredweight in the event that one of the first two contract months settles at limit on the previous trading day - The Straits Times Index (STI) ended +16.42 points higher or +0.51% to 3243.65, taking the year-to-date performance to +2.49%. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index gained +0.29% while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index gained +0.71%. The top active stocks were Keppel Corp (+2.68%), SingTel (-1.02%), DBS (+2.36%), Global Logistic (-3.21%) and UOB (+0.30%). The outperforming sectors today were represented by the FTSE ST Basic Materials Index (+3.13%). The two biggest stocks of the FTSE ST Basic Materials Index are Midas Holdings (+6.38%) and Geo Energy Resources (unchanged). The underperforming sector was the FTSE ST Telecommunications Index, which declined -0.98% with SingTel’s share price declining -1.02% and StarHub’s share price declining-0.73%. The three most active Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) by value today were the IS MSCI India (+2.56%), DBXT CSI300 ETF (+0.42%), STI ETF (+0.61%). The three most active Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) by value were Ascendas REIT (-0.42%), Keppel DC REIT (unchanged), Suntec REIT (+0.26%). The most active index warrants by value today were HSI23400MBeCW150129 (+7.32%), HSI22600MBePW150129 (unchanged), HSI24000MBeCW150129 (+12.50%). The most active stock warrants by value today were KepCorp MBeCW150602 (+21.95%), DBS MB eCW150420 (+29.29%), DBS MB ePW150402 (-18.03%) - Spain’s Director of Public Prosecutions, Eduardo Torres Dulce, has resigned from the post for “personal reasons”, Spanish daily El Mundo reported this morning. A spokesman for the Public Prosecutor’s office confirmed the news by telephone to The Spain Report, saying that Mr. Torres Dulce had informed Justice Minister Rafael Catalá of his decision: “but that it perhaps would not come into effect until they find a replacement”. That decision is taken at cabinet level. The next cabinet meeting for Rajoy’s government is tomorrow morning - Hedge funds including Marshall Wace, Odey Asset Management and Lansdowne Partners are shorting OTP Bank Plc, a Hungarian lender with a Russian subsidiary whose shares have fallen almost 6% this month reports Albourne Village. All three London-based funds took or increased their position this month in OTP, Hungary’s largest lender, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The ruble rose today in Moscow after plunging as much as 19%against the dollar yesterday, when Russia’s central bank increased interest rates to 17% percent from 10.5 percent in an attempt to stem the decline. The ruble is down 52% this year and has taken a disproportionate beating in the wake of sanctions and falling oil prices. The country still has the third largest currency reserves in the world and so is unlikely to default. According to Eric Chaney, Manolis Davradakis and Greg Venizelos from AXA IM’s Research and Investment Strategy team Russia will likely resort to fiscal stimulus to contain the risk of social and political unrest. Capital controls, political unrest and even default on private hard currency debts are possible outcomes they say. They credit default swaps market is pricing a one-third probability of sovereign default within five years - Indonesia is ramping up financing for its $439bn development program, planning an almost fivefold increase in sales of project sukuk. The government is seeking to raise IDR7.14trn rupiah (around $568m) from notes that will fund particular construction ventures next year, compared with IDR1.5trn this year, which say local press reports, will help finance its estimated spending of about IDR5,519trn from 2015 to 2019 to build roads, railways and power plants.
ALGO trading: a moveable feast Photograph © Robertds/Dreamstime.com, supplied March 2013.

ALGO trading: a moveable feast

Tuesday, 19 March 2013
ALGO trading: a moveable feast Algorithms have come a long way since the early days when traders used simple volume weighted average price (VWAP) routines to facilitate execution in large cap stocks. Technology has helped, of course; computers can now process so much data in near real time that programmers can incorporate feedback from the market to alter the way algorithms execute or route orders on the fly. Attitudes toward algorithms have evolved, too. Any lingering reservations—not uncommon among old-school traders—about how algorithms might perform during market dislocations were put to rest during the 2008/09 financial crisis. Today’s trading tools are smarter and more flexible than ever—and so are the users. Neil A O’Hara reports. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/media/k2/items/cache/f8c1ec925a18c92698c05bff8c327469_XL.jpg

Algorithms have come a long way since the early days when traders used simple volume weighted average price (VWAP) routines to facilitate execution in large cap stocks. Technology has helped, of course; computers can now process so much data in near real time that programmers can incorporate feedback from the market to alter the way algorithms execute or route orders on the fly. Attitudes toward algorithms have evolved, too. Any lingering reservations—not uncommon among old-school traders—about how algorithms might perform during market dislocations were put to rest during the 2008/09 financial crisis. Today’s trading tools are smarter and more flexible than ever—and so are the users. Neil A O’Hara reports.

The proportion of trades now executed by algorithms is a movable feast depending on who is asked. A buy side desk may say it uses algorithms for 30% of its trading, counting only the orders it handles using direct market access or other electronic broker pipes. The other 70% of orders are called in to brokers, where the sell side trading desk will likely enter the flow into algorithms for execution. “Most US equity trading now uses some sort of algorithm,” says Scott Daspin, a managing director in the global execution group at ConvergEx. “The average block size continues to fall and appropriate execution requires a trading tool.”


Growing confidence in algorithms has encouraged buy side traders to exploit more complex routines. While some players still rely primarily on VWAP—quantitative shops doing mass optimisations of market neutral trades, for example—this long-time favourite has given way to implementation shortfall routines designed to minimize market impact. Traders specify the degree of urgency and the algorithm tries to optimise execution within that time frame. Based on measures of liquidity in the name and where the liquidity is concentrated, the algorithm will select the best routing among venues and decide whether and when to cross the spread to obtain a fill. “Clients are moving toward implementation shortfall as their primary benchmark,” says Daspin.




Average investment holding periods have come down in recent years, which has reinforced the focus on implementation shortfall. The shorter the time horizon, the more market impact costs affect the expected return on the trade. If a portfolio manager expects a 5%-10% uptick in price from a positive earnings announcement next week, the difference between 50 basis points (bps) and 150bps in market impact matters more than for a stock expected to rise 30% over two years.


For sensitive trades that are not urgent, traders may prefer a dark aggregator algorithm designed to tap liquidity only in dark pools where the footprint of a large order is harder to detect. Some dark pools are darker than others, and some admit participants whose activities may be toxic to large orders so traders can exclude certain venues or order types on a particular venue. Jeffrey Bacidore, head of algorithmic trading at ITG, has seen attitudes toward dark aggregators evolve, too. At first, traders would designate where they were and were not willing to trade, but now they take a more nuanced approach. “Shutting a dark pool out completely means there is absolutely no liquidity in there a trader ever wants to participate in,” he says. “That can’t be true.”


ITG and other providers have built more sophisticated algorithms that expose bigger size in clean pools but still show some interest, albeit with stronger safeguards against gaming, in more suspect pools. The buy side does not have the resources to monitor every venue in detail, which has led firms to lean on brokers to deliver an acceptable end result. “Brokers have to justify their decisions and provide good performance,” says Bacidore. “Clients find it hard to stay on top of the landscape. They have outsourced that to brokers and hold us accountable.”


The buy side learned long ago that while brokers always claim to put clients’ interests first a broker’s own interests will take priority if the client suffers no harm, at least in theory. In the spirit of “trust, but verify” the buy side is demanding more transparency about how algorithms route orders and where they are filled. Convergex has just opened its kimono through a Web portal on which clients who enter a ticker symbol and size can see a forecast of the expected market impact, how long it will take to complete the order, where the trade will route and where fills are expected. When clients enter a live order, they can see in real time where the order goes and the fills come from.


“When we demo this technology to people we don’t know, they fall off their chairs,” says Daspin. “We can practically see them reaching for the phone to ask their existing brokers how orders are routed.”


The degree of transparency ConvergEx offers allows buy side traders to tweak their execution strategy based on hard data about which venues give the best fills in a name. Sometimes it requires just a change in the parameters entered into the algorithm, but Convergex will customise the algorithm if need be. “The beauty of transparency is that people can make the algorithm exactly what they want, which is not the same thing for everyone,” says Gary Ardell, head of financial engineering and advanced trading solutions at ConvergEx.“Transparency helps clients get the right tool for the right job.”


The heightened transparency may tax the capacity of some buy side shops to make good use of it, however. Paul Daley, head of product development at SunGard’s Fox River Execution Solutions, says many clients struggle with the sheer volume of data generated in the full routing disclosure his firm provides and prefer to rely on monthly summaries instead. The snag? The summaries only includes trades done through Fox River, so users cannot compare the results with trades done through other brokers who do not offer similar transparency.


Clients who use the complete data dump can see where orders went, whether they were ever routed from one venue to another, how they were executed and whether they took or provided liquidity. “Over time, people are getting more into the logic of why a broker went to a particular venue, not just where it went,” says Daley. “People will use the tools and get their hands around the data.” He expects buy side trading desks to hire quantitative analysts with a grasp of trading who can use their programming skills to mine the data and suggest improvements in how the desk interacts with the market.


The buy side trader’s role continues to evolve from the jumped-up order clerk of yore toward equal partnership in the investment process. Traders don’t have to watch the market all the time any more; they can focus on higher value-added tasks like picking the best execution strategy and leave implementation to the machines. “A human does not have to look at the screen, see the bid move up a penny and decide whether to cancel and resubmit the order,” says Bacidore at ITG. “The algorithm has already done that if it makes sense. The trader looks at the objective and works more closely with the portfolio manager behind the trade.”


The nature of product development for algorithms has changed, too. Ten years ago, Bacidore says the main concern was to ensure the routines were robust and would not break down or go haywire. Today, those safeguards are a given and developers spend more time figuring out how to source liquidity as efficiently as possible. They also know other technology-savvy market participants like high frequency traders will try to reverse engineer or game their designs, a constant threat to buy side clients. “We have to have cutting edge technology,” says Bacidore. “We must be as smart and efficient as the best people in the market if we are to deliver good results to our clients.”


While technical improvements in single name algorithms will continue, the bigger challenge is to perfect algorithms that can handle baskets of stocks. It’s a daunting task: not only must the algorithm process data on all the individual names but the trading in one name affects how other names are traded. In a market neutral (equal dollar amounts to buy and sell) basket of 1,000 names, for example, the algorithm must maintain balance so that buys and sells don’t run too far out of whack. “The algorithm takes into account portfolio level objectives and constraints,” says Bacidore. “It comes at a cost, though—they can’t be too dynamic.” If a block showed up in an illiquid name on an institutional dark pool, a human trader might grab it but the algorithm might not because a large fill would unbalance the basket.


Another difficulty is the lack of industry consensus about how basket algorithms should work. The objective is clear: to minimize risk and maximize return on the trade—but opinions differ over what that means in practice. The uncertainty has hampered development efforts, according to Daley. Fox River could build an algorithm that made sense to its developers but if clients reject the logic it would be wasted effort. “We all agree what a VWAP algorithm is,” says Daley, “but we don’t necessarily agree what a basket algorithm is. There is a tremendous amount of unsatisfied demand in that space.”

Tweets by @DataLend

DataLend is a global securities finance market data provider covering 42,000+ unique securities globally with a total on-loan value of more than $1.8 trillion.

What do our tweets mean? See: http://bit.ly/18YlGjP

Related News

Related Articles

Related Blogs