Wednesday 30th July 2014
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TICKER - WEDNESDAY - JULY 30th: Avanti Mining Inc has entered into a debt financing mandate letter with a syndicate of six lenders to provide secured debt finance facilities worth $612m to develop the Kitsault molybdenum mine. Lenders include BNP Paribas, Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation, Export Development Canada, Korea Development Bank, Mizuho Bank and UniCredit Bank. The facility set out in the term sheet is comprised of $500m senior debt for a term of 10.5 years, $42m in equipment finance for a term of 5 years and $70m in the form of standby cost over-run facilities for a term of 8 years. The interest rate is LIBOR based, loan repayments are semi-annual or quarterly (for equipment finance) and there are mandatory prepayment provisions of a portion of excess free cash flow. The facility will include customary provisions for a financing of this type, including fees, representations and warranties, covenants, events of default and security customary for this type of financing - Jupiter Fund Management reports strong investment performance with assets under management rising to £33.1bn, with the asset manager benefitting from net mutual fund inflows of £875m over the first half of this year. The firm says it has maintained operating margins above 50%. Maarten Slendebroek, chief executive, says “We are pleased with the progress being made on the implementation of our growth strategy during the first half of 2014. The Board’s intention to increase cash returns to shareholders through a combination of ordinary and special dividends reflects this progress and confidence in our future growth potential. We believe this approach will allow shareholders to participate in our organic growth story while receiving an attractive yield.” There will be an analyst presentation to discuss the results on July 30th at 9.00am at FTI Consulting, 200 Aldersgate, Aldersgate Street, London, EC1A 4HD and is also accessible via a live audiocast for those unable to attend in person - CME Clearing says it will remove the Exchange-For-Swap (EFS) identifier for all NYMEX, COMEX and DME exchange futures executed in accordance with CME Rule 538 (Exchange for Related Positions). CME products were removed from EFS eligibility in October of 2010, and CBT products were removed from EFS eligibility in July of 2012. With this final transition, EFS will no longer be a supported transaction type at CME. The EFS transaction type has been harmonized into, and falls under, the Exchange for Risk (EFR) transaction referenced in Rule 538. EFR transactions are privately negotiated transactions (PNT) and include the simultaneous exchange of an Exchange futures position for a corresponding OTC swap or other OTC instrument. In addition, NYMEX, COMEX and DME exchange products will continue to be eligible for Exchange for Physical (EFP) and Exchange of Options for Options (EOO) privately negotiated transactions. Currently, an EFS transaction is represented as a TrdTyp=”12” on TrdCaptRpt messages. Effective on the above date, the TrdTyp value for these transactions should be submitted as “11” (EFR). CME Clearing will reject any NYMEX, COMEX, or DME exchange privately negotiated futures message sent as an EFS. The trade will subsequently need to be resubmitted with a valid transaction type to CME Clearing. Additionally, CME Clearing will re-categorize the Exchange of Options for Options (EOO) transaction type for all CME, CBOT, NYMEX, COMEX, and DME products. Currently, an EOO is represented as an option on an exchange for swap (EFS) in clearing and on FIXML TrdCaptRpt messages. Going forward, an EOO transaction will be represented as an option on an Exchange for Risk (EFR) - Chi-X® Japan Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of alternative market operator Chi-X® Global Holdings LLC, says local brokers Yamawa Securities Co., Ltd. and Ark Securities Co Ltd., have commenced trading on Chi-X Japan, bringing the total number of trading participants to 23. Yamawa Securities and Ark Securities will access its market centre through Intertrade’s platform - The upgrade of the cities of Bogota and Medellin by Moody’s follows the upgrade on Colombia's sovereign ratings and reflects the close economic and operational links that these cities have with the central government. The rating action also reflects Bogota and Medellin's relatively solid financial metrics and moderate debt levels. The ratings assigned to both Bogota and Medellin are supported by their strong economic position in Colombia that includes a high level of own-source revenues and diversified local economies. The positive prospects of economic growth in the country translate in supportive conditions for both cities through higher local economic growth and own-source revenue growth. The assigned ratings also consider the close oversight that Colombia's central government exerts over the country's regional and local governments. Bogota and Medellin show solid governance and management practices that have supported historical low to moderate debt levels and moderate cash financing requirements, says the ratings agency. Between 2011 and 2013, Bogota's cash financing requirements averaged -5.7% of total revenues and net direct and indirect debt averaged 18.4% of total revenues. Medellin's cash financing requirements over the same period averaged -5.8% of total revenues and debt levels averaged 17.6% of total revenues.
Investors come back to the markets in search of returns Photograph © Xy/ Dreamstime.com, supplied March 2013.

Investors come back to the markets in search of returns

Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Investors come back to the markets in search of returns The markets this year have started with a bullet. The current bull market hints that investor confidence might be rising as the debt crisis in Europe looks to be under control and the US is managing its fiscal cliff. What are the implications of this sea-change? Carey Olsen, which advises on the largest total number of funds and assets under management in Guernsey, believes there will be slow and steady growth in both fund creation and the breadth of investments they adopt. Corporate partner, Graham Hall, examines where this growth will come from and what innovations investors and private equity houses are employing to realise returns. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/media/k2/items/cache/e37cb185c8f2dc5dd52ce2fc045570ec_XL.jpg

The markets this year have started with a bullet. The current bull market hints that investor confidence might be rising as the debt crisis in Europe looks to be under control and the US is managing its fiscal cliff. What are the implications of this sea-change? Carey Olsen, which advises on the largest total number of funds and assets under management in Guernsey, believes there will be slow and steady growth in both fund creation and the breadth of investments they adopt. Corporate partner, Graham Hall, examines where this growth will come from and what innovations investors and private equity houses are employing to realise returns.

Equities have started to move this year. Having locked up money for four years, keeping their money in ‘safe’ investments, investors now look to be interested again in assets which they think offer potential for higher yields. There is, of course, some residual skittishness but recent movement in the markets indicates there is a lot more confidence and enthusiasm.


There have been rallies in the past which have not stuck and there is still a question mark as to whether (or how long) this one will hold. However, the market does seem to think there is a way to go before there will be any sort of correction.


If the past four years has taught anything it is that it often pays to be innovative and funds are seeking unusual opportunities where the risk is seen as manageable. With interest rates remaining at historic lows, investors are chasing yield and the focus is firmly on emerging, or high growth markets, particularly those with a history of under-investment. Eastern Europe is a particular case in point. Bulgaria, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Poland, Slovakia, Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia joined the European Union club in the past eight years while Montenegro, Serbia, the Republic of Macedonia and Turkey remain in the wings, with EU membership only a function of time.


In spite of some structural economic problems, growth figures across the region remain attractive. The Polish economy, for instance, grew by 3.8% in 2011; Austria grew by 3.3%, while Moldova, Estonia and Lithuania all grew between 6% and 7% in real gross domestic product (GDP) terms.


These figures compare to Germany’s 2.7% growth and the Eurozone’s blended growth rate of around 1.6%, over the same year. The growth rates in the eastern European zone points to opportunities in the development of infrastructure and commercial property (where property values remain low, but high returns are predicted); it is an attractive combination for investors recently starved of promising investments in Western Europe and the United States.


Graham HallGraham Hall, corporate partner, Carey Olsen, Guernsey.Debt is also attractive as banks get rid of their loan books and finance houses adjust their loan-to-asset ratios. Much of this debt is now being sold off, sometimes their whole debt portfolios.  Debt books can be picked up relatively cheaply by smaller operators at significantly reduced rates. Of particular interest, but not openly discussed, are lease car debt books. These books are sold at significant discounts and it is an area of significant potential returns as the economy improves and the risk of holding this debt reduces.


Hedge funds also have appeal right now. They are performing better than they have in a long while and investors are beginning to recoup, or certainly looking to, the losses of the past. Whether it means more money being invested in hedge funds remains to be seen. It is difficult to give a time frame on when we might see a return to more halcyon days because, while there are individuals and select funds rallying, it is the big institutional pension funds that are needed to ensure a true return to performance. This sector is traditionally cautious and, having been severely hit in the crisis, their return will be slow and steady. It is really only 10% of the market that is prepared to take a risk and they appear to be a lot more open to the idea this year.


There was a flight to Luxembourg by many hedge funds during the economic crisis thinking they needed to be seen to be onshore. Many are now realising this was a false perception as Luxembourg is an expensive and bureaucratic place to do business which has an impact in the efficiency of the funds and the returns that can be made. These funds are starting to look at other jurisdictions that offer ­stability and pragmatic regulation without the expense or bureaucracy. As ever, Guernsey is ideally placed to reap these opportunities. According to the Guernsey Financial Services Commission, the net asset value of total funds under management and administration increased in the third quarter (Q3) in 2012 by £3.6bn (1.3%) to reach £274.4bn.


For the year since 30th September 2011, total net asset values increased by £3.3bn (1.2%). Guernsey is indicative of the worldwide trend where the interest in open-ended funds has decreased by £1.6bn (-3.2%) over the quarter to £51.5bn. The closed-ended sector increased over the quarter, by £4.2bn (3.3%) to reach £130.3bn. This represents an increase of £4.6bn (3.7%) over the year since 30th September 2011.


The market recognises Guernsey’s proven operating model with highly skilled professionals across the board. It is up to Guernsey to ensure it does not become too expensive but this is a secondary consideration to investors with the level of expertise and experience being far more important. Investors and funds, now more than ever, want to know that a jurisdiction has breadth and depth.


It would be overstating the case to suggest the fund markets are entirely out of the woods; but there are definitely strong ‘green shoots’. Guernsey certainly remains the most popular jurisdiction for private equity albeit with fewer funds being created. There is activity from global private equity houses investing in infrastructure (Terra Firma, Permira, and Apex). They continue to invest but at lower levels. For example, the focus has been on global farmland as a sound investment for some of these closed-ended funds with investments being made in cattle stations in Australia and New Zealand (beef and dairy) and in China.


It is tighter market and funds are looking much harder at efficiencies and costs. It is harder to raise the money and it takes longer and funds are launching with lower expectations which, arguably, is no bad thing.


Closed-ended funds are the majority of the market now and will continue to grow. 2013 has started as a bull market. The driving sentiment is one of optimism. There is a movement away from bonds and corporate gilts but there will not be a return the pre-2008 activity for a long time—slow and steady seems to be this year’s watchwords.

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