Friday 27th May 2016
NEWS TICKER: THURSDAY, MAY 26TH - Dan Carter has been appointed lead manager of the Jupiter Japan Income Fund, with immediate effect. Dan, who is currently deputy manager of the fund will take over from Simon Somerville, who will be leaving Jupiter after eleven years. Carter has 12 years’ experience of analysing and managing Japanese equities, and has worked alongside Somerville for eight years. He has also lead managed the Jupiter Japan Select Sicav fund, aimed at international clients, since 2013, having been deputy manager for two years. There will be no change to the investment philosophy of the fund says Jupiter and the funds will continue to be managed alongside each other, ensuring continuity for investors. There is a significant overlap between the two portfolios in terms of the companies they are invested in. The funds seek to own long-term positions in cash-generative, income-paying Japanese companies that are run for shareholders, have a genuine competitive advantage and offer real, identifiable growth opportunities that he believes are underappreciated by the market. Carter joined Jupiter in 2008 as an analyst on the Far Eastern Equities team. Before that he was a Fund Manager at Odey Asset Management on the Japanese equities team, and was previously at Baillie Gifford & Co, where he was an investment analyst for both the Japanese equities and UK large-cap equities teams - CME Group Executive Chairman and President Terry Duffy will appear before the Illinois House Revenue and Finance Committee today to discuss how imposing a proposed tax on financial transactions would harm Illinois consumers, agricultural producers, businesses and the state economy. "Imposing a financial transaction tax will not alleviate the state's budget crisis, and instead would have a negative impact on consumers because the cost of hedging their business risks would go up as much as 800 percent," said Duffy. "If enacted, every business that uses any risk management tools would face higher costs as bid/ask spreads widen. Farmers, ranchers and other businesses in Illinois and all over the country would be forced to pass along those costs to consumers, who would pay more for food, gas, airline tickets and other products. Additionally, a transaction tax would put the largest exchange in the US, which is headquartered in Illinois, at a competitive disadvantage in the global marketplace." The hearing is scheduled for 10:00 am CT in the Capitol Building in Springfield, Illinois. Duffy's testimony will be available on www.cmegroup.com at the same time as the hearing - Moody's has upgraded to A3 from Baa1 the senior unsecured debt ratings of Autoroutes du Sud de la France (ASF). Concurrently, Moody's has upgraded to (P)A3 from (P)Baa1 the rating on the company's €8bn medium-term note (EMTN) programme. The outlook on the ratings is stable. The upgrade reflects ASF's strengthening financial profile on the back of a strong traffic performance and expected future traffic growth, says the ratings agency. ASF is expected to exhibit funds from operation/debt metrics firmly in the mid-teens in percentage terms, which Moody's considers commensurate with the A3 rating level. In 2015, ASF reported traffic growth of 3.1% compared to the previous year. “We expect traffic growth to moderate during the year, although the 2016 annual traffic increase is anticipated to be at least 2%. The positive traffic trends, which offset the financial impact of the 2015 tolls freeze and the relatively limited toll increases in 2016(1.63% for ASF and 1.18% for Escota), are supportive of ASF's credit profile in the context of the group's increasing investments associated with the implementation of the so-called Plan de Reliance Autoroutier (a government stimulus plan),” says Moody’s. ASF is expected to implement capital expenditure worth €800m per annum over the next three years - The European Parliament has approved aid on Thursday worth €6,468,000 for 557 redundant workers from the “Larissa” supermarket in Greece and €5,146,800 for 2,132 former drivers for the road haulage and delivery firm MoryGlobal SAS in France. The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) aid will still need to be approved by the Council of Ministers on June 6th. In Greece, Larissa’s 422 employees and 135 worker-owners were made redundant when the cooperative supermarket was declared bankrupt. In France, MoryGlobal’s 2,132 lorry drivers and their delivery colleagues lost their jobs due to its bankruptcy and closure. Both bankruptcies resulted from the prolonged global financial and economic crisis which has devastated the Greek economy and deeply affected the road haulage sector. The measures, co-financed by the EGF and the Greek and French governments, would help the workers to find new jobs by providing them with occupational guidance and other assistance schemes. The aid request from France was passed by 540 votes to 73, with 2 abstentions. The request from Greece was approved by 551 votes to 67, with two abstentions. The European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) was introduced in 2007 as a flexible instrument in the EU budget to provide support, under specific conditions, to workers who have lost their jobs as a result of mass redundancies caused by major changes in global trade (e.g. delocalisation to third countries). The EGF contributes to packages of tailor-made services to help redundant workers find new jobs. Its annual ceiling is €150m. Redundant workers are offered measures such as support for business start-ups, job-search assistance, occupational guidance and various kinds of training - Pirum Systems says Ben Challice will be joining as chief operating officer, responsible for strategic product and market development. Challice joins from Nomura, where he headed up Global Prime Services – which included Equity Finance, Prime Brokerage and Delta One at Nomura and previously held senior positions at Lehman Brothers and Goldman Sachs - Catella has appointed Antti Louko to head its Finnish operations and to establish a new corporate finance unit in Helsinki. Louko will join Catella as managing director of Catella Property Oy and head of the new corporate finance unit, from November. Louko joins Catella from a role as head of real estate at Advium Corporate Finance Oy where he headed the real estate team. He previously worked as the director responsible for transactions at SRV Group, and at Aberdeen Property Investors - Advanced payments tech firm SafeCharge says Umberto Corridori has been appoint vice president of sales for Europe. Corridori has held senior roles in large companies such as Dell Italy and joins after a long tenure at PayPal where he served as head of sales Italy & iGaming CEMEA - AIM-listed Xtract Resources PLC says it has entered into an agreement to sell the Manica Gold project in Mozambique to Nexus Capital and Mineral Technologies International Ltd for $17.5m in cash. The firm says some of the proceeds will be used to settle outstanding payments owed to Auroch over the acquisition of the Manica licence. Xtract adds that it expects to have remaining cash proceeds of approximately $12m. Under the agreement, Xtract will sell its 100% interest in Explorator Limitada, the entity which holds title to the Manica mining licence 3990C on completion of the deal. Xtract said it is expected that a bankable feasibility study, to assess the viability of developing and mining a hard rock gold deposit identified within the Manica licence, will be completed in the second quarter of 2016, Mine construction is planned to begin in the fourth quarter, with first production to follow in the final quarter of 2017. Mining of the alluvial gold deposit is planned for the third quarter this year – The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) is providing up to €294m in local currency equivalent for two ground-breaking projects to increase the use of domestically produced natural gas and largely replace the use of coal in Kazakhstan. The first project is the upcoming modernisation and refurbishment of the underground storage in Bozoi in the Bank’s first-ever cooperation with the national gas company KazTransGas (KTG). An EBRD loan equivalent to €242m in local currency to the KazTransGas subsidiary Intergas Central Asia will allow for the upgrade of the storage to its full capacity of 4bn cubic metres (bcm), from the current limit of 2.6 bcm - United Utilities reported a 0.6% rise in full year revenue to £1.73bn this morning, although the new regulated price controls contributed to a 9% drop in underlying operating profit to £604m. The company says it is confident of reaching its targets for capital expenditure in the first year of the new regulatory period and announced plans to invest £100m across the 2015-2020 period in renewable energy projects, mainly solar power. The final dividend was raised 2% to 25.6p, making a total of 38.45p for the year – Ahead of its planned initial public offering in Australia, fantasy sports app Sports Hero has raised an additional $2.4m in funding. SportsHero is a new app that lets sports fans dabble in match predictions and show their skills off against friends and other game-watchers. The app is made by the team behind Singapore-based TradeHero, a virtual trading app backed by more than $10m from investors. - DONG Energy has set an indicative price range for its planned stock market listing of 17.4% of its shares at DKR200 to DKR255 per share, giving the group a market value of DKR83.5bn to DKR106.5bn ( between $12.6bn and $16bn), making it Europe’s biggest float this year. The state-controlled company, is one of the world’s largest offshore wind farm developers -

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Rehypothecation revisited Photograph © Sureshr/Dreamstime.com, supplied March 2013.

Rehypothecation revisited

Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Rehypothecation revisited Under the right circumstances, rehypothecation—leverage derived from the re-use of existing client collateral—can provide brokers with optimised borrowing opportunities, while giving lenders a reduction in transactional costs. If handled improperly, however, the process can easily go awry—and in a pretty big way. How do you ensure you get it right? US Editor, Dave Simons gives us his view. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/media/k2/items/cache/403e40be559614364503454ce1dd5df3_XL.jpg

Under the right circumstances, rehypothecation—leverage derived from the re-use of existing client collateral—can provide brokers with optimised borrowing opportunities, while giving lenders a reduction in transactional costs. If handled improperly, however, the process can easily go awry—and in a pretty big way. How do you ensure you get it right? US Editor, Dave Simons gives us his view.

Five years ago last month I sat down with Kevin Davis inside the Manhattan offices of ill-fated futures brokerage MF Global, as the soon-to-be ex-chief executive officer laid out his plans for the newly launched spin-off of Britain’s Man Group.


Describing the income MF Global’s team pulled in through clearing and execution regardless of which way the markets went, Davis concluded that “any news is good news—whether it’s good, or bad.” Just days later, one of Davis’s minions, Brent Dooley, who worked out of the firm’s Memphis office, went home and, in a single evening, racked up a $141m loss while recklessly trading wheat futures out of his own account, using the Chicago Mercantile Exchange’s (CME’s) order-entry system. By the time our inconveniently scheduled March cover story was out, MF Global’s shares were already off 70%; months later Davis was done, Dooley was on his way to court—and incredibly that was just the beginning.




Two years later the company, now under the direction of Jon Corzine, the former governor of New Jersey, began an estimated $6.3bn wager on the bonds of various indebted European nations as part of an aggressive campaign to restore shareholder value. Still in a weakened state following the Dooley affair, the company never­theless employed various hyper-leveraged strategies that by all accounts included the process known as rehypothecation—off balance-sheet leverage derived from the re-use of existing client collateral.


Totally legit (in the United States, brokerages are allowed to pledge up to 140% of client’s liabilities), rehypothecation nevertheless has its share of pitfalls, including the need for borrowers to post additional margin on a moment’s notice in order to mollify dubious creditors and regulators.


James MalgieriJames Malgieri, head of service delivery and regional management for BNY Mellon’s Global Collateral Services business.Though Corzine’s bet was right on the money—at maturity all of his eurobond picks paid in full—unfortunately he, nor anyone else at MF Global, would be around to claim victory. Kneecapped by a swift succession of credit downgrades and margin calls, MF Global collapsed in October 2011; unable to raise cash fast enough to stay afloat. Along the way an ­estimated $1.6bn in client assets went missing; miraculously, a court ruling finalised just last month paved the way for nearly all of the misappropriated funds to be returned to its rightful owners.


MF Global was hardly the first to give rehypothecation a bad name (that list includes the mother of all meltdowns, Lehman), but in its wake critics have called for a thorough re-examination of rehypothecation regulation. To sceptics, rehypothecation is part of the same freewheeling, risk-taking environment that made it possible for a lone impulsive trader to deal a near-fatal blow to a $1.4bn operation, then allow a seasoned veteran to come in and finish the job.


For starters, under rehypothecation it is possible for pledged collateral to be co-mingled with other assets on the balance sheet. Keeping pledged and non-pledged securities independently domiciled is key to preventing client assets from being re-hypothecated, say reform advocates, who see a need for greater clarity around asset segregation. A likely byproduct of current regulatory efforts, then, will be a true segregation of client collateral, thereby making it more difficult for unwanted rehypothecations to occur.


In the recent Commonfund Institute report Managing Counterparty Risk in an Unstable Financial System, David Belmont, chief risk officer for Wilton, Connecticut-based financial-services firm Commonfund, noted a conspicuous lack of clarity around the types of assets used for rehypothecation. This has fueled demand for increased broker reporting, says Belmont, “including daily reports on where their assets are being held and which have been lent out or re-hypothecated.”


Benefits—and drawbacks
Even so, proponents believe that rehypothecation can still be an attractive proposition for brokers who are keen on optimising borrowing opportunities, as well as lenders seeking a reduction in transactional costs. To avoid the mistakes of the past and maintain the integrity of the re-pledged collateral, rehypothecation requires the presence of transparent, fully automated monitoring systems and operational practices, including the use of segregated accounts.


Judson BakerJudson Baker, product manager for Northern Trust’s asset-servicing division.Under rehypothecation, “if someone is pledging a bond as collateral, the receiver of the collateral may be able to onward pledge that specific bond to satisfy a margin demand from a separate party,” says Judson Baker, product manager for Northern Trust’s asset-servicing division. “They are essentially using the bond as if it were their own to help meet a margin call, as opposed to using their own trading assets for that margin requirement.”


While reducing initial trade costs and related funding transactions, rehypothecation also facilitates increased velocity and liquidity around financing transactions, says Jean-Robert Wilkin, head of collateral management and securities lending products at Clearstream. “ICSD triparty agents [such as] Clearstream have offered collateral re-use for years, in a manner that is very transparent and is based exclusively on the settlement of securities which are subject to transfer of ownership,” says Wilkin. Rather than question the integrity of rehypothe­cation, industry members “should be able to clearly demonstrate its proper usage, including the manner in ­collateral information is reported to all  involved.”


Since cash can be easily segregated from other assets, rehypothecation issues are less likely to arise. Things can become a bit trickier, however, once securities come into the mix. As such, a number of funds remain dead-set against using rehypothecation, due in large part to the inefficiencies involved. “They would simply rather use funds that are more accessible to them,” says Baker.


If recent history is any judge, rehypothecation has the capacity to create more problems than it solves. ­“Rehypothecation requires that you have processes in place that allow you to easily track the whereabouts of that collateral,” says Baker. “And if your exposure to the first party swings to the point that they need to call in the collateral, you then have to then find an acceptable substitute to bring to Firm B in order to return the initial asset. Operationally, that can be a bit tedious.”


Throw in a few extra nuances, and suddenly you’ve got the makings a quasi-serious settlement-risk issue. “For instance, when substituting collateral, some firms will insist that the re-pledged asset be of like value, and require that the asset is in their possession before they agree to release the asset. That’s when things can become operationally painful—particularly if all the right pieces don’t immediately fall into place.”


For lending agents, rehypothecation does increase the amount of securities available for loan purposes, and as such could conceivably create more revenue, concurs Claire Johnson, head of marketing and product for CIBC Mellon. Providing access to higher-quality ­collateral is yet another potential benefit, adds Johnson, particularly at a time when US Federal Reserve asset purchases and sovereign-debt downgrades are making collateral harder to come by.


Claire JohnsonClaire Johnson, head of marketing and product for CIBC Mellon.Nevertheless, CIBC Mellon believes the risks outweigh the benefits, and, in line with Canada’s general regulatory stance, does not rehypothecate collateral within its lending program. “We have taken the position that the prospective risks associated with having to unwind a multi-level series of collateral trades mean potential delays,” notes Johnson, “which could create challenges or even exposures in a rapidly-changing market environment. Operationally, the collateral could be substituted at any time, and on the loan side we would have to recall it. So there are also potential relationship and reputation concerns in terms of lending out clients’ collateral.”


Rehypothecation for Transformation
In contrast, using rehypothecation as part of a broader collateral-transformation strategy, whereby an equity or lower-quality bond is upgraded in order to meet a margin requirement, has been generally well-received within the markets. “Dealers, clearing firms and custodians have all been seriously looking into this area,” says Baker. “At Northern Trust we have a very strong securities-lending arm, and because this process heavily leverages lending operations, we feel it is a natural fit for us. There are a number of ways for us to make this work—we can act as repo agent, serve as the trade counterparty, as well as line up clients who are holding long positions and are willing to pledge assets in return for higher yield.”


Going forward, this will require that banks such as Northern Trust keep a much closer watch on liquidity ratios, as well as the credit on both sides of the trade, all the while carefully ­monitoring counterparty activities. “While it may be a slightly different form of monitoring than we typically undertake, it’s not a new kind of service altogether,” notes Baker. “As a result, we feel we are in a much better position coming into this, compared to those who may be just starting from scratch.”


Recognising the need to corral risk associated with rehypothecation, custody providers have increasingly extolled the virtues of tri-party ­arrangements, using an integrated prime-custody offering to connect prime brokerages with fund-manager clients.


Rather than risk having their assets subjected to rehypothecation in the first place hedge funds have increasingly sought out zero-margin, long-only prime-custody accounts. At present nearly one in two hedge funds with assets under management (AUM) in excess of $1bn maintain prime-custody arrangements, according to a BNY Mellon/Finadium report issued last fall, up sharply from just 15% five years ago.


The bottom line, says James ­Malgieri, head of service delivery and regional management for BNY Mellon’s Global Collateral Services business, is that one cannot rehypothecate collateral without having the consent of the client. “If you buy stocks on margin in the US, you are required to sign a rehypothecation agreement that allows your broker to re-use those securities in order to raise financing,” says Malgieri. “This puts the onus on the lender to ask questions regarding the broker’s intent to rehypothecate, including with whom, what, when and how.”


As many of the problems associated with rehypothecation have been the result of introducing an “outside” third party, using a custodian as collateral agent gives clients the assurance that their assets will at least stay within the program, says Malgieri. “The key feature here is the ability to control the pledged assets—and in this situation, the collateral agent has the ability to bring bona fide transparency to the rehypothecation process. If you look back at some of the defaults that have occurred in situations where the dealer had the right to rehypothecate, very often the clients didn’t actually know where the rehypothecated securities were headed. Again, if a client is willing to post collateral to be re-used, they had better find out why and what the broker is going to do with it.”


With proper transparency in place and the right kinds of questions asked, rehypothecation can achieve its stated goal of providing added efficiency, as well as more favorable lending terms for the client. “And keeping the ­rehypothecation within network is obviously key to this effort,” says Malgieri.”

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