Monday 25th July 2016
NEWS TICKER: JULY 25TH 2016: The Straits Times Index (STI) ended 4.87 points or 0.17% higher to 2945.35, taking the year-to-date performance to +2.17%. The top active stocks today were Singtel, which gained 1.66%, DBS, which declined 0.06%, Wilmar Intl, which declined 0.97%, UOB, which gained0.26% and ComfortDelGro, with a1.73% fall. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index declined 0.84%, while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index declined0.24%. Elsewhere in Asia, Taiwan stocks retreat from over 1-year high; TSMC down. Taiwan stocks retreated from more-than-one-year highs on Monday as investors took profits on recent winners such as Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co (TSMC). The main index fell 0.6 percent at 8,954.58 points. It reached as high as 9,085.91 earlier in the session, an intraday level not seen since July 2015. The electronics subindex and the financial sub-index were both down about 0.7%. TSMC, the world's top contract chip maker, was off nearly 1%. The yen traded weaker with trade data showing better than expected figures though exports and imports declined notably ahead of a week that will see the Fed and the Bank of Japan comment on monetary policy. The adjusted trade balance came in at a surplus of ¥33bn while and imports eased 18.8%, less than the 19.7% drop expected and exports fell 7.4%, less than the 11.6% decline anticipated. The overall trade balance came in at a surplus of ¥693bn, better than the ¥495bn expected. USD/JPY changed hands at 106.32, up 0.18%, while AUD/USD traded at 0.7478, up 0.17%. GBP/USD traded at 1.3135, up 0.19%. -- Rangold Resources will be announcing its Q2 results at the London Stock Exchange on Thursday, August 4th – Most equity markets kicked off higher today, buoyed by the firm tone of the G-20 Finance Ministers meeting which promised “to use all policy tools –monetary, fiscal and structural- individually and collectively” to achieve the goal of “sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth” in view of lingering concerns over spillover effects from Brexit. Central bank meetings will be the focus of market attention this week. The Fed is widely expected to leave its monetary policy unchanged this week. However, a recent string of better than expected U.S. data reignited speculation that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates before the end of the year. Interest rate futures are currently pricing in a 45% chance of a rate hike by December, compared with less than 20% a week ago and up from 9% at the start of this month. The Fed monetary oversight committee starts its two-day meeting tomorrow. However, the story this week will focus on the Bank of Japan: will it, won’t it expand its monetary policy, without ‘helicopter money’? According to Russell Matthews, a portfolio manager at Russell Matthews, “Core government bond markets have largely moved sideways and very short dated US rates have repriced the probability of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike in 2016 meaningfully higher. Corporate bonds have continued to perform well as the insatiable demand for yield is unabated, with spreads compressing in all sectors… Rate and sovereign credit have had a good run of late but the question we are asking ourselves is are we at the point where policy makers and investors have become complacent? Our mantra has always been that policy makers are likely to be lazy and under deliver if there is no pressure from markets. We have been through two major risk events in the last six weeks (Brexit, Turkey) and risk assets have continued to perform. We expected and anticipated this outcome, but that does not prevent us from becoming uneasy at the level of calm that we are witnessing, and the growing confidence that the market has with policy makers.” The other trend on investors’ minds will be the EU’s stance on Italy’s growing banking crisis: will the EU stick its ostrich like head in the sand? Elsewhere in Europe, Greek Minister of Finance Euclid Tsakalotos stated in an interview on Saturday that the primary surplus targets until 2018 are attainable and the government will not have to activate the automatic spending cuts mechanism. Beyond 2018 and in the medium term, however, the Greek government will pursue through negotiations primary surplus targets below 3.5% of GDP -

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Actis launches Energy Impact Model

Tuesday, 07 February 2012
Actis launches Energy Impact Model Actis, the pan-emerging markets private equity investor, has today announced the launch of the Actis Energy Impact Model, a tool for assessing progress over the life of its energy investments. The Impact Model reportedly captures in a systematic way the key drivers that build value, and helps pinpoint where action is required. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Actis, the pan-emerging markets private equity investor, has today announced the launch of the Actis Energy Impact Model, a tool for assessing progress over the life of its energy investments. The Impact Model reportedly captures in a systematic way the key drivers that build value, and helps pinpoint where action is required.

The model has been under development since mid-2010 and is based on the Five Capitals model developed by Forum for the Future, a leading sustainability NGO that works with the business community. The five capitals are finance, people, social/community, infrastructure and environment, to which Actis has added a sixth, namely governance. The firm has also worked with Forum and Imperial College to test and improve the model.

“Actis believes the capital it invests in the emerging markets should be transformational for society. This model enables that wider impact to be properly measured and adjusted, and helps us to measure the non-financial drivers of market value. The Impact Model will help to build value in our portfolio companies that is meaningful and increases the financial worth of each company,” explains Torbjorn Caesar, co-head Energy at the firm.



The Impact Model requires Actis and the management of its investee companies to score each investment twice a year on up to 63 criteria, both quantitative and qualitative. For example, under the category of Environment, a quantitative criterion would be GHG Emission, which is assessed by measuring distribution losses as a percentage of energy dispatched, while a qualitative criterion would be the Impact on Land rated on a scale of 1 to 5. The results can then used for benchmarking, annual planning, target setting and review by both Actis and the investee company’s executive team. The model can also be used as part of the initial investment decision.

“From our work with leading companies, we know that hardwiring sustainability into management processes (such as impact indicators) is a critical element in making that part of everything the business does,” notes Jonathon Porritt at Forum for the Future.

Initially, Actis will apply the model to all its energy investments, which may well result in further refinement of the metrics. The Impact Model is structured so that individual indicators can be changed and improved over time without disrupting the core of the model. The firm is confident that measuring the impact of its investments will drive long-term sustainable value, and has developed a similar framework to assess the non financial value drivers of its other investments, but the ultimate ambition is for the private equity industry more widely to take it up.

“Offering the Impact Model to other private equity firms to adopt is a brilliant act of leadership. Pioneering companies realise that their success relies on many others,” says orritt. “Actis can help the private equity industry shed some of its negative reputation, and open up the prospect of a private equity sector that directs its undoubted dynamism at generating returns from sustainable activities.”

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