Sunday 24th May 2015
NEWS TICKER: FRIDAY, MAY 22ND: The California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS) has named Beliz Chappuie as CalPERS' Chief Auditor, effective July 31, 2015 - Saudi Arabia's oil minister has said the country will switch its energy focus to solar power as the nation envisages an end to fossil fuels, possibly around 2040-2050, Reuters reports. "In Saudi Arabia, we recognise that eventually, one of these days, we are not going to need fossil fuels, I don't know when, in 2040, 2050... we have embarked on a program to develop solar energy," Ali Al-Naimi told a business and climate conference in Paris, the news service reports. "Hopefully, one of these days, instead of exporting fossil fuels, we will be exporting gigawatts, electric ones. Does that sound good?" The minster is also reported to say he still expects the world's energy mix to be dominated by fossil fuels in the near future - Barclays has appointed Steve Rickards as head of offshore funds. He will lead the creation and implementation of the bank’s offshore funds strategy and report directly to Paul Savery, managing director of personal and corporate banking in the Channel Islands. For the last four years Mr Rickards has been heading up the Guernsey Funds team providing debt solutions for private equity and working with locally based fund administrators. Savery says: “Barclays’ funds segment has seen some terrific cross functional success over the past year or so. Specifically, the offshore business has worked hand in hand with the funds team in London to bring the very best of Barclays to our clients, and Steve has been a real catalyst to driving this relationship from a Guernsey perspective.” - Moody's has downgraded Uzbekistan based Qishloq Qurilish Bank's (QQB’s) local-currency deposit rating to B2, and downgraded BCA to b3 and assigned a Counterparty Risk Assessment of B1(cr)/Not prime(cr) to the bank. The agency says the impact on QQB of the publication of Moody's revised bank methodology and QQB's weak asset quality and moderate loss-absorption capacity are the reasons for the downgrades. Concurrently, Moody's has confirmed QQB's long-term B2 foreign-currency deposit rating and assigned stable outlooks to all of the affected long-term ratings. The short-term deposit ratings of Not-prime were unaffected - Delinquencies of the Dutch residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) market fell during the three-month period ended March 2015, according to Moody's. The 60+ day delinquencies of Dutch RMBS, including Dutch mortgage loans benefitting from a Nationale Hypotheek Garantie, decreased to 0.85% in March 2015 from 0.92% in December 2014. The 90+ day delinquencies also decreased to 0.66% in March 2015 from 0.71% in December 2014.Nevertheless, cumulative defaults increased to 0.65% of the original balance, plus additions (in the case of master issuers) and replenishments, in March 2015 from 0.56% in December 2014. Cumulative losses increased slightly to 0.13% in March 2015 from 0.11% in December 2014 – Asset manager Jupiter has recruited fund manager Jason Pidcock to build Asian Income strategy at the firm. Pidcock J has built a strong reputation at Newton Investment Management for the management of income-orientated assets in Asian markets and, in particular the £4.4bn Newton Asian Income Fund, which he has managed since its launch in 2005. The fund has delivered a return of 64.0% over the past five years compared with 35.9% for the IA Asia Pacific Ex Japan sector average, placing it 4th in the sector. Since launch it has returned 191.4 against 154.1% for the sector average. Before joining Newton in 2004, Jason was responsible for stock selection and asset allocation in the Asia ex-Japan region for the BP Pension Fund.

BlackRock's 2013 market outlook predicts improving investment prospects

Sunday, 23 December 2012
BlackRock's 2013 market outlook predicts improving investment prospects Prospects are improving for a positive albeit gradual turn next year in global economic and investment conditions, according to the BlackRock Investment Institute’s 2013 investment outlook.  The report, entitled ‘Slow Turn Ahead?’ urges investors to keep a close eye on the impact of government policy – first and foremost, the urgent effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in the US, which will drive the direction of both the US and global economies in the New Year. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Prospects are improving for a positive albeit gradual turn next year in global economic and investment conditions, according to the BlackRock Investment Institute’s 2013 investment outlook.  The report, entitled ‘Slow Turn Ahead?’ urges investors to keep a close eye on the impact of government policy – first and foremost, the urgent effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in the US, which will drive the direction of both the US and global economies in the New Year.

“Our big questions for 2013 are whether the wave of ultra-loose monetary policies and quantitative easing has crested and if private sector credit can stage a modest recovery,” says Ewen Cameron Watt, BII’s chief investment strategist. “Trillions of dollars in monetary stimulus and record low interest rates have failed to spur much credit growth and economic activity so far. But what if this changes? Policy - fiscal, monetary and regulatory - drove markets in 2012 and will remain central to 2013 outcomes,” adds Cameron Watt.

With central banks apparently refocusing monetary stimulus away from preventing a financial sector collapse and towards targeting economic growth, next steps by the US Federal Reserve will merit particularly close attention, according to the report.



“We do not expect the Fed to raise rates any time soon. But it could take its foot off the monetary accelerator on signs of quickening job growth in the second half of 2013,”says Cameron Wat. “Markets need only a whiff of a Fed preparing to slow its QE programmes because of improving employment to empty some of the vast store of investor money in cash and low-yielding fixed income assets, and put it into equities.”

In the US, much hinges on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff, a set of tax hikes and spending cuts set to go into effect on 1 January. "The United States may turn the corner on growth – if Washington can avoid falling off the fiscal cliff and negotiate a long-term budget reduction plan,” according to the report. Regulation remains an important focus too, whether it be financial sector reform in the developed world or social security and welfare reforms in emerging economies. Politics also will play a role again in 2013 with elections in, among other nations, Italy, Germany and Israel, alongside US budget reform.

BII’s Five-Point Summary for 2013

  1. We have become more upbeat about the prospects for risk assets and stabilising economic growth (albeit at low levels). Low expectations = potential upside surprises.
  2. The US economy should gain momentum and help boost global growth – IF Washington can avoid the “fiscal cliff” and compromise on a sustainable budget.
  3. Many investors lack conviction in markets where risk taking is often punished and trends last a skinny minute. Rome – and confidence – was not built in a day.
  4. The era of ultra-loose monetary policy may draw to a close, challenging “safe” fixed income assets and heralding a shift toward equities. Safety = new tail risk.
  5. Income investing works in a zero-rate world – but the hunt for yield has narrowed valuations between top-quality and not-so great income assets. Take out the garbage. 

So What Do I Do With My Money?

Here is a summary of the BII’s investment recommendations for 2013:

Fixed Income: Danger in Safety

Prices of safe-haven government bonds and similar assets could plunge when yields start to rise. Low yield = high price risk.  We like global high yield and US munis for income – but do not expect much capital appreciation. We favour emerging market debt.  In Europe, we prefer Italian and Spanish bonds over debt of weaker core countries. We are bullish on commercial mortgage-backed securities and collaterised loan obligations.

Equities: Global Smorgasbord

We like global companies with strong balance sheets, steady cash flows and growing dividends. We favour high-quality US stocks, global energy and emerging markets.  We are bullish on domestic consumption plays in Brazil and China, North Asian cyclical stocks, and Mexican banks and industrials. We like discounted exporters on Europe’s periphery and small “self-help” UK companies.

Commodities: Long View

We like metals with long-term supply gaps and agricultural commodities.  China’s appetite is huge.

Currencies: Dollar Bulls

We are bullish on the US dollar due to the country’s energy boom and long-term growth prospects.

Good and Bad Income

Income investing remains our strategy of choice in a zero-rate world. The hunt for yield has created pockets of overheating and narrowed valuations between top-quality and less desirable income assets. The report details the state of play in fixed income, high yield, emerging market debt, municipal bonds, dividends, and real estate investment trusts.

 

Pain Trades

Our biggest contrarian idea is buying Japanese exporters while selling the yen. Other pain trades include selling “safe” tobacco stocks, buying US companies with cash piles abroad, and buying securities of European and US financials. We have warmed up to Indian equities after the country’s reforms on foreign investment.

The Gift of Insurance

Short-term implied volatility is eerily low whereas policy uncertainties are near financial crisis levels. Consider options to hedge downside and upside risks.

Volatility Reversal?

The fire hose of monetary liquidity and investor hunger for yield has depressed short-term volatility, so maybe a reversal will have the opposite effect.

 

 

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