Friday 29th August 2014
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South Africa’s central bank has disagreed with a ratings decision by Moody’s to downgrade Capitec Bank Limited (Capitec) by two notches, and place it on review for a further downgrade. The central bank says it respects the independent opinion of rating agencies but that it does not “agree with the rationale given in taking this step”. Two reasons are given for the rating action: a lower likelihood of sovereign systemic support based on decisions recently taken in relation to African Bank Limited (African Bank), and heightened concerns regarding the risk inherent in Capitec’s consumer lending focus. “With regard to the first point, it is important to reiterate that the approach taken by the SARB to any resolution to address systemic risk will always be based on the circumstances and merits of the particular prevailing situation. Decisions will also be informed, as was the case with African Bank, by principles contained in the Key Attributes for Effective Resolution Regimes proposed by the Financial Stability Board (FSB), which have the objective that a bank should be able to fail without affecting the system,” notes the central bank in an official statement. “This is in keeping with evolving international best practice. In the case of African Bank bond holders and wholesale depositors are taking a 10% haircut, which is generally regarded as being very positive given that the trades following the announcement of African Bank's results were taking place at around 40% of par. Therefore in fact substantial support was provided, not reduced. Moreover, all retail depositors were kept whole and are able to access their accounts fully,” it adds - According to the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) credit card receivables increased by 2.1% in the second quarter to HKD112, after a reduction of 6.7% in the previous quarter. The total number of credit card accounts edged up by 0.7% to around 16.8m.The rollover amount, which reflects the amount of borrowing by customers using their credit cards, increased by 2.9% during the quarter to HKD19.2bn. The rollover ratio also rose marginally from 17.0% to 17.1% in the same period. The charge-off amount increased to HKD569mduring the quarter from HKD528m in the previous quarter. Correspondingly, the quarterly charge-off ratio rose to 0.51% from 0.46% in the previous quarter. The amount of rescheduled receivables transferred outside the surveyed institutions’ credit card portfolios reduced to HKD94m from HK$109m in the previous quarter. The delinquent amount increased to HKD249m at end-June from HKD239m at end-March. However, the delinquency ratio remained the same at 0.22% because of an increase in total card receivables. The combined delinquent and rescheduled ratio (after taking into account the transfer of rescheduled receivables mentioned above) edged up to 0.29% from 0.28% during the same period - Harkand has been awarded a contract to support Apache with inspection, repair and maintenance work (IRM) as well as light construction (LC) across their assets in the North Sea, following completion of a competitive tender exercise. The award includes the provision of vessels, ROV and diving services for a three-year period, plus two one-year options. The firm will also support offshore marine construction contractor EMAS AMC who have been awarded a separate contract for pipe lay and heavy construction as part of the same tender process. Harkand Europe managing director, David Kerr, said: “This contract is an important step in strengthening our close working relationship and growing our North Sea business with Apache.

BlackRock's 2013 market outlook predicts improving investment prospects

Sunday, 23 December 2012
BlackRock's 2013 market outlook predicts improving investment prospects Prospects are improving for a positive albeit gradual turn next year in global economic and investment conditions, according to the BlackRock Investment Institute’s 2013 investment outlook.  The report, entitled ‘Slow Turn Ahead?’ urges investors to keep a close eye on the impact of government policy – first and foremost, the urgent effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in the US, which will drive the direction of both the US and global economies in the New Year. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Prospects are improving for a positive albeit gradual turn next year in global economic and investment conditions, according to the BlackRock Investment Institute’s 2013 investment outlook.  The report, entitled ‘Slow Turn Ahead?’ urges investors to keep a close eye on the impact of government policy – first and foremost, the urgent effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in the US, which will drive the direction of both the US and global economies in the New Year.

“Our big questions for 2013 are whether the wave of ultra-loose monetary policies and quantitative easing has crested and if private sector credit can stage a modest recovery,” says Ewen Cameron Watt, BII’s chief investment strategist. “Trillions of dollars in monetary stimulus and record low interest rates have failed to spur much credit growth and economic activity so far. But what if this changes? Policy - fiscal, monetary and regulatory - drove markets in 2012 and will remain central to 2013 outcomes,” adds Cameron Watt.

With central banks apparently refocusing monetary stimulus away from preventing a financial sector collapse and towards targeting economic growth, next steps by the US Federal Reserve will merit particularly close attention, according to the report.

“We do not expect the Fed to raise rates any time soon. But it could take its foot off the monetary accelerator on signs of quickening job growth in the second half of 2013,”says Cameron Wat. “Markets need only a whiff of a Fed preparing to slow its QE programmes because of improving employment to empty some of the vast store of investor money in cash and low-yielding fixed income assets, and put it into equities.”

In the US, much hinges on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff, a set of tax hikes and spending cuts set to go into effect on 1 January. "The United States may turn the corner on growth – if Washington can avoid falling off the fiscal cliff and negotiate a long-term budget reduction plan,” according to the report. Regulation remains an important focus too, whether it be financial sector reform in the developed world or social security and welfare reforms in emerging economies. Politics also will play a role again in 2013 with elections in, among other nations, Italy, Germany and Israel, alongside US budget reform.

BII’s Five-Point Summary for 2013

  1. We have become more upbeat about the prospects for risk assets and stabilising economic growth (albeit at low levels). Low expectations = potential upside surprises.
  2. The US economy should gain momentum and help boost global growth – IF Washington can avoid the “fiscal cliff” and compromise on a sustainable budget.
  3. Many investors lack conviction in markets where risk taking is often punished and trends last a skinny minute. Rome – and confidence – was not built in a day.
  4. The era of ultra-loose monetary policy may draw to a close, challenging “safe” fixed income assets and heralding a shift toward equities. Safety = new tail risk.
  5. Income investing works in a zero-rate world – but the hunt for yield has narrowed valuations between top-quality and not-so great income assets. Take out the garbage. 

So What Do I Do With My Money?

Here is a summary of the BII’s investment recommendations for 2013:

Fixed Income: Danger in Safety

Prices of safe-haven government bonds and similar assets could plunge when yields start to rise. Low yield = high price risk.  We like global high yield and US munis for income – but do not expect much capital appreciation. We favour emerging market debt.  In Europe, we prefer Italian and Spanish bonds over debt of weaker core countries. We are bullish on commercial mortgage-backed securities and collaterised loan obligations.

Equities: Global Smorgasbord

We like global companies with strong balance sheets, steady cash flows and growing dividends. We favour high-quality US stocks, global energy and emerging markets.  We are bullish on domestic consumption plays in Brazil and China, North Asian cyclical stocks, and Mexican banks and industrials. We like discounted exporters on Europe’s periphery and small “self-help” UK companies.

Commodities: Long View

We like metals with long-term supply gaps and agricultural commodities.  China’s appetite is huge.

Currencies: Dollar Bulls

We are bullish on the US dollar due to the country’s energy boom and long-term growth prospects.

Good and Bad Income

Income investing remains our strategy of choice in a zero-rate world. The hunt for yield has created pockets of overheating and narrowed valuations between top-quality and less desirable income assets. The report details the state of play in fixed income, high yield, emerging market debt, municipal bonds, dividends, and real estate investment trusts.

 

Pain Trades

Our biggest contrarian idea is buying Japanese exporters while selling the yen. Other pain trades include selling “safe” tobacco stocks, buying US companies with cash piles abroad, and buying securities of European and US financials. We have warmed up to Indian equities after the country’s reforms on foreign investment.

The Gift of Insurance

Short-term implied volatility is eerily low whereas policy uncertainties are near financial crisis levels. Consider options to hedge downside and upside risks.

Volatility Reversal?

The fire hose of monetary liquidity and investor hunger for yield has depressed short-term volatility, so maybe a reversal will have the opposite effect.

 

 

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