Friday 1st August 2014
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THURSDAY TICKER: 31ST JULY 2014 - Standard & Poor's says Argentina is in selective default on foreign-currency-denominated debt, after the government failed to make a $539m payment on $13bn in restructured bonds. Argentina had transferred the money to the paying agent, but a US judge would not allow its release unless hedge funds holding bonds not included in a restructuring also were paid. The latest default is expected to exacerbate problems in Argentina's recession-hit economy, analysts say. This is the second time Argentina has defaulted on its debt in the last thirteen years, after last-minute talks in New York with a group of bond-holders ended in failure. Vulture fund" investors were demanding a full pay-out of $1.3bn (£766m) on bonds they hold. Argentina has said it cannot afford to do so, and has accused them of using its debt problems to make profits - In a regulatory filing made public earlier this week, and US press reports, BlackRock has begun the process of establishing a Wholly Foreign-Owned Enterprise (WFOE) in Shanghai. The firm is reportedly creating an investment advisory WFOE which will give it significantly greater flexibility and speed in executing its Greater China strategies – Shares in Chinese footwear manufacturer Feike AG have been listed on the General Standard of the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. Ten million shares have been listed at an initial price of €7.50. ACON Aktienbank AG is supporting the issue. Scheich & Partner Börsenmakler GmbH is the specialist. This is the third Chinese company to list on the exchange according to managing director Michael Krogmann. “With the IPO we have achieved an important strategic milestone. This helps us to expand our competitive position and our brand awareness in the booming Chinese market for children’s footwear as well as to realise future growth plans”, says Andy Hock Sim Liew, CFO of Feike AG - Funding pressures stemming from reduced central government capital grants and the persistence of tightened long-term bank lending are likely to fuel the English housing association sector's continued use of capital markets over the next two years, says Moody's Investors Service in a new report published today. The new report English Housing Associations: Financial Disintermediation- A One Way Trip, is the third in a series on European sub-sovereigns' financing needs and access to market funding.

BlackRock's 2013 market outlook predicts improving investment prospects

Sunday, 23 December 2012
BlackRock's 2013 market outlook predicts improving investment prospects Prospects are improving for a positive albeit gradual turn next year in global economic and investment conditions, according to the BlackRock Investment Institute’s 2013 investment outlook.  The report, entitled ‘Slow Turn Ahead?’ urges investors to keep a close eye on the impact of government policy – first and foremost, the urgent effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in the US, which will drive the direction of both the US and global economies in the New Year. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Prospects are improving for a positive albeit gradual turn next year in global economic and investment conditions, according to the BlackRock Investment Institute’s 2013 investment outlook.  The report, entitled ‘Slow Turn Ahead?’ urges investors to keep a close eye on the impact of government policy – first and foremost, the urgent effort to avoid the fiscal cliff in the US, which will drive the direction of both the US and global economies in the New Year.

“Our big questions for 2013 are whether the wave of ultra-loose monetary policies and quantitative easing has crested and if private sector credit can stage a modest recovery,” says Ewen Cameron Watt, BII’s chief investment strategist. “Trillions of dollars in monetary stimulus and record low interest rates have failed to spur much credit growth and economic activity so far. But what if this changes? Policy - fiscal, monetary and regulatory - drove markets in 2012 and will remain central to 2013 outcomes,” adds Cameron Watt.

With central banks apparently refocusing monetary stimulus away from preventing a financial sector collapse and towards targeting economic growth, next steps by the US Federal Reserve will merit particularly close attention, according to the report.

“We do not expect the Fed to raise rates any time soon. But it could take its foot off the monetary accelerator on signs of quickening job growth in the second half of 2013,”says Cameron Wat. “Markets need only a whiff of a Fed preparing to slow its QE programmes because of improving employment to empty some of the vast store of investor money in cash and low-yielding fixed income assets, and put it into equities.”

In the US, much hinges on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff, a set of tax hikes and spending cuts set to go into effect on 1 January. "The United States may turn the corner on growth – if Washington can avoid falling off the fiscal cliff and negotiate a long-term budget reduction plan,” according to the report. Regulation remains an important focus too, whether it be financial sector reform in the developed world or social security and welfare reforms in emerging economies. Politics also will play a role again in 2013 with elections in, among other nations, Italy, Germany and Israel, alongside US budget reform.

BII’s Five-Point Summary for 2013

  1. We have become more upbeat about the prospects for risk assets and stabilising economic growth (albeit at low levels). Low expectations = potential upside surprises.
  2. The US economy should gain momentum and help boost global growth – IF Washington can avoid the “fiscal cliff” and compromise on a sustainable budget.
  3. Many investors lack conviction in markets where risk taking is often punished and trends last a skinny minute. Rome – and confidence – was not built in a day.
  4. The era of ultra-loose monetary policy may draw to a close, challenging “safe” fixed income assets and heralding a shift toward equities. Safety = new tail risk.
  5. Income investing works in a zero-rate world – but the hunt for yield has narrowed valuations between top-quality and not-so great income assets. Take out the garbage. 

So What Do I Do With My Money?

Here is a summary of the BII’s investment recommendations for 2013:

Fixed Income: Danger in Safety

Prices of safe-haven government bonds and similar assets could plunge when yields start to rise. Low yield = high price risk.  We like global high yield and US munis for income – but do not expect much capital appreciation. We favour emerging market debt.  In Europe, we prefer Italian and Spanish bonds over debt of weaker core countries. We are bullish on commercial mortgage-backed securities and collaterised loan obligations.

Equities: Global Smorgasbord

We like global companies with strong balance sheets, steady cash flows and growing dividends. We favour high-quality US stocks, global energy and emerging markets.  We are bullish on domestic consumption plays in Brazil and China, North Asian cyclical stocks, and Mexican banks and industrials. We like discounted exporters on Europe’s periphery and small “self-help” UK companies.

Commodities: Long View

We like metals with long-term supply gaps and agricultural commodities.  China’s appetite is huge.

Currencies: Dollar Bulls

We are bullish on the US dollar due to the country’s energy boom and long-term growth prospects.

Good and Bad Income

Income investing remains our strategy of choice in a zero-rate world. The hunt for yield has created pockets of overheating and narrowed valuations between top-quality and less desirable income assets. The report details the state of play in fixed income, high yield, emerging market debt, municipal bonds, dividends, and real estate investment trusts.

 

Pain Trades

Our biggest contrarian idea is buying Japanese exporters while selling the yen. Other pain trades include selling “safe” tobacco stocks, buying US companies with cash piles abroad, and buying securities of European and US financials. We have warmed up to Indian equities after the country’s reforms on foreign investment.

The Gift of Insurance

Short-term implied volatility is eerily low whereas policy uncertainties are near financial crisis levels. Consider options to hedge downside and upside risks.

Volatility Reversal?

The fire hose of monetary liquidity and investor hunger for yield has depressed short-term volatility, so maybe a reversal will have the opposite effect.

 

 

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