Friday 29th August 2014
slib33
South Africa’s central bank has disagreed with a ratings decision by Moody’s to downgrade Capitec Bank Limited (Capitec) by two notches, and place it on review for a further downgrade. The central bank says it respects the independent opinion of rating agencies but that it does not “agree with the rationale given in taking this step”. Two reasons are given for the rating action: a lower likelihood of sovereign systemic support based on decisions recently taken in relation to African Bank Limited (African Bank), and heightened concerns regarding the risk inherent in Capitec’s consumer lending focus. “With regard to the first point, it is important to reiterate that the approach taken by the SARB to any resolution to address systemic risk will always be based on the circumstances and merits of the particular prevailing situation. Decisions will also be informed, as was the case with African Bank, by principles contained in the Key Attributes for Effective Resolution Regimes proposed by the Financial Stability Board (FSB), which have the objective that a bank should be able to fail without affecting the system,” notes the central bank in an official statement. “This is in keeping with evolving international best practice. In the case of African Bank bond holders and wholesale depositors are taking a 10% haircut, which is generally regarded as being very positive given that the trades following the announcement of African Bank's results were taking place at around 40% of par. Therefore in fact substantial support was provided, not reduced. Moreover, all retail depositors were kept whole and are able to access their accounts fully,” it adds - According to the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) credit card receivables increased by 2.1% in the second quarter to HKD112, after a reduction of 6.7% in the previous quarter. The total number of credit card accounts edged up by 0.7% to around 16.8m.The rollover amount, which reflects the amount of borrowing by customers using their credit cards, increased by 2.9% during the quarter to HKD19.2bn. The rollover ratio also rose marginally from 17.0% to 17.1% in the same period. The charge-off amount increased to HKD569mduring the quarter from HKD528m in the previous quarter. Correspondingly, the quarterly charge-off ratio rose to 0.51% from 0.46% in the previous quarter. The amount of rescheduled receivables transferred outside the surveyed institutions’ credit card portfolios reduced to HKD94m from HK$109m in the previous quarter. The delinquent amount increased to HKD249m at end-June from HKD239m at end-March. However, the delinquency ratio remained the same at 0.22% because of an increase in total card receivables. The combined delinquent and rescheduled ratio (after taking into account the transfer of rescheduled receivables mentioned above) edged up to 0.29% from 0.28% during the same period - Harkand has been awarded a contract to support Apache with inspection, repair and maintenance work (IRM) as well as light construction (LC) across their assets in the North Sea, following completion of a competitive tender exercise. The award includes the provision of vessels, ROV and diving services for a three-year period, plus two one-year options. The firm will also support offshore marine construction contractor EMAS AMC who have been awarded a separate contract for pipe lay and heavy construction as part of the same tender process. Harkand Europe managing director, David Kerr, said: “This contract is an important step in strengthening our close working relationship and growing our North Sea business with Apache.

BNY Mellon releases outlook for Asian hedge funds

Wednesday, 06 February 2013
BNY Mellon releases outlook for Asian hedge funds According to a market outlook report released by BNY Mellon today, the year ahead will likely remain sharply challenging for Asian hedge fund managers looking to raise new investor capital. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

According to a market outlook report released by BNY Mellon today, the year ahead will likely remain sharply challenging for Asian hedge fund managers looking to raise new investor capital.

The “stars” of recent years that have lodged standout gains will continue to see moderate inflows from their traditional investors – US institutions – while new entrants are turning to ultra-high net worth investors, family offices and their own friends amid a dearth of institutional seed capital.

Commenting on the issues in the continued evolution of Asia’s hedge funds market, Aidan Houlihan, managing director for BNY Mellon’s alternative investment services says: “From my vantage point here in Hong Kong, I believe the gathering trend for 2013 is the continued gradual evolution of Asia’s hedge fund community. Although we expect fewer fund launches over the next 12 months, we do anticipate that the new crop will be more diverse in its range of investment strategies.  This will support Asia’s gradual shifting away from a monolithic emphasis on equity long-short strategies. Already, more esoteric credit and macro-oriented strategies as well as multi-strategy funds have entered the market. Today, equity long-short funds account for roughly 75% of hedge fund assets under management, down from 90% just a few years ago.

“We believe the hedge fund industry in Asia will continue to grow and evolve and provide investors with more options. Whilst it is certainly true that we expect to see fewer launches in 2013, we believe the quality of the funds coming to market and level of assets under management they will raise on launch date will continue to increase.

“In my opinion, one of the main headwinds for the average hedge fund in Asia in the year ahead will continue to be raising capital. The new capital coming into Asia will largely be limited to outliers that have significantly outperformed both peers and the broader market. These fund managers have consistently been rewarded with capital inflows, and investor interest in them remains high.

“Seeding arrangements for early stage hedge funds in Asia have become harder to secure. The spate of high profile launches in the first half of 2012 ultimately proved short-lived. Many, however, have found success tapping less conventional capital raising channels such as family offices, ultra-high net worth individuals and personal friends.  Smaller funds have also adapted by becoming creative in their investor targeting. And renewed interest in hedge funds in general should trickle down to the start-up space, both globally and in Asia. He added.

Investor Concentration

A tricky issue for funds in Asia is the over reliance on US investment,  with 80% of funds currently being raised for Asian products coming from American investment, the majority of the remaining 20% is from European sources, leaving a small amount from regional sources.

Mr Houlihan says : “I believe Asian hedge funds need to try and cultivate a deeper base of investors in their home markets. The majority are overly reliant on foreign capital, which is a trend we expect to continue into 2013.

“The formula for diversifying their shareholder base may be quite simple: better performance. The challenge for the hedge fund industry overall will be maintaining – and in some cases re-establishing – its reputation as an asset class that can outperform the broader market and provide uncorrelated returns. The last couple of years have challenged that reputation. But if hedge funds regain their footing this year, we expect fundraising to improve apace, and Asian fund managers should definitely participate in that trend.”

Related News

Related Articles

Related Blogs

Tweets by @DataLend

DataLend is a global securities finance market data provider covering 42,000+ unique securities globally with a total on-loan value of more than $1.8 trillion.

What do our tweets mean? See: http://bit.ly/18YlGjP