Thursday 31st July 2014
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TICKER - WEDNESDAY - JULY 30th: Avanti Mining Inc has entered into a debt financing mandate letter with a syndicate of six lenders to provide secured debt finance facilities worth $612m to develop the Kitsault molybdenum mine. Lenders include BNP Paribas, Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation, Export Development Canada, Korea Development Bank, Mizuho Bank and UniCredit Bank. The facility set out in the term sheet is comprised of $500m senior debt for a term of 10.5 years, $42m in equipment finance for a term of 5 years and $70m in the form of standby cost over-run facilities for a term of 8 years. The interest rate is LIBOR based, loan repayments are semi-annual or quarterly (for equipment finance) and there are mandatory prepayment provisions of a portion of excess free cash flow. The facility will include customary provisions for a financing of this type, including fees, representations and warranties, covenants, events of default and security customary for this type of financing - Jupiter Fund Management reports strong investment performance with assets under management rising to £33.1bn, with the asset manager benefitting from net mutual fund inflows of £875m over the first half of this year. The firm says it has maintained operating margins above 50%. Maarten Slendebroek, chief executive, says “We are pleased with the progress being made on the implementation of our growth strategy during the first half of 2014. The Board’s intention to increase cash returns to shareholders through a combination of ordinary and special dividends reflects this progress and confidence in our future growth potential. We believe this approach will allow shareholders to participate in our organic growth story while receiving an attractive yield.” There will be an analyst presentation to discuss the results on July 30th at 9.00am at FTI Consulting, 200 Aldersgate, Aldersgate Street, London, EC1A 4HD and is also accessible via a live audiocast for those unable to attend in person - CME Clearing says it will remove the Exchange-For-Swap (EFS) identifier for all NYMEX, COMEX and DME exchange futures executed in accordance with CME Rule 538 (Exchange for Related Positions). CME products were removed from EFS eligibility in October of 2010, and CBT products were removed from EFS eligibility in July of 2012. With this final transition, EFS will no longer be a supported transaction type at CME. The EFS transaction type has been harmonized into, and falls under, the Exchange for Risk (EFR) transaction referenced in Rule 538. EFR transactions are privately negotiated transactions (PNT) and include the simultaneous exchange of an Exchange futures position for a corresponding OTC swap or other OTC instrument. In addition, NYMEX, COMEX and DME exchange products will continue to be eligible for Exchange for Physical (EFP) and Exchange of Options for Options (EOO) privately negotiated transactions. Currently, an EFS transaction is represented as a TrdTyp=”12” on TrdCaptRpt messages. Effective on the above date, the TrdTyp value for these transactions should be submitted as “11” (EFR). CME Clearing will reject any NYMEX, COMEX, or DME exchange privately negotiated futures message sent as an EFS. The trade will subsequently need to be resubmitted with a valid transaction type to CME Clearing. Additionally, CME Clearing will re-categorize the Exchange of Options for Options (EOO) transaction type for all CME, CBOT, NYMEX, COMEX, and DME products. Currently, an EOO is represented as an option on an exchange for swap (EFS) in clearing and on FIXML TrdCaptRpt messages. Going forward, an EOO transaction will be represented as an option on an Exchange for Risk (EFR) - Chi-X® Japan Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of alternative market operator Chi-X® Global Holdings LLC, says local brokers Yamawa Securities Co., Ltd. and Ark Securities Co Ltd., have commenced trading on Chi-X Japan, bringing the total number of trading participants to 23. Yamawa Securities and Ark Securities will access its market centre through Intertrade’s platform - The upgrade of the cities of Bogota and Medellin by Moody’s follows the upgrade on Colombia's sovereign ratings and reflects the close economic and operational links that these cities have with the central government. The rating action also reflects Bogota and Medellin's relatively solid financial metrics and moderate debt levels. The ratings assigned to both Bogota and Medellin are supported by their strong economic position in Colombia that includes a high level of own-source revenues and diversified local economies. The positive prospects of economic growth in the country translate in supportive conditions for both cities through higher local economic growth and own-source revenue growth. The assigned ratings also consider the close oversight that Colombia's central government exerts over the country's regional and local governments. Bogota and Medellin show solid governance and management practices that have supported historical low to moderate debt levels and moderate cash financing requirements, says the ratings agency. Between 2011 and 2013, Bogota's cash financing requirements averaged -5.7% of total revenues and net direct and indirect debt averaged 18.4% of total revenues. Medellin's cash financing requirements over the same period averaged -5.8% of total revenues and debt levels averaged 17.6% of total revenues.

IOSCO publishes a report on institutional investors in emerging markets

Thursday, 14 June 2012
IOSCO publishes a report on institutional investors in emerging markets The International Organisation of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) has published  a report on Development and Regulation of Institutional Investors in Emerging Markets, which focuses on a wide range of developmental issues and challenges faced by emerging markets seeking to develop their institutional investor base. Some of these challenges include limited capital market size and liquidity, competition to capital market investment from substitute services, regulatory restrictions, overly dominant distribution channels and constraints on cross-border activities. Additional discussions on related macro-economic and capital market conditions in the emerging markets and analysis of cross-border activities of institutional investors are also included in the report.     http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

The International Organisation of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) has published  a report on Development and Regulation of Institutional Investors in Emerging Markets, which focuses on a wide range of developmental issues and challenges faced by emerging markets seeking to develop their institutional investor base. Some of these challenges include limited capital market size and liquidity, competition to capital market investment from substitute services, regulatory restrictions, overly dominant distribution channels and constraints on cross-border activities. Additional discussions on related macro-economic and capital market conditions in the emerging markets and analysis of cross-border activities of institutional investors are also included in the report.

 

 

The report offers a set of key recommendations for policy makers and regulators looking to attract and better regulate institutional investors in their jurisdictions.  It highlights the importance of the legal protection of property and ownership rights. It also emphasizes the need to ensure reasonable transaction costs, develop flexible trading and hedging mechanisms, remove undue administrative impediments on product authorization processes, build a multi-pillar pension system with tax incentives and provide a level playing field for foreign investors. Finally, the report recommends that regulators periodically review the regulatory framework and coverage, combine deregulation with enhanced supervision and enforcement, and improve coordination with other regulatory bodies to monitor, mitigate and manage systemic risk.

The IOSCO Emerging Markets Committee (EMC) established a Project Team to review the development and regulation of institutional investors in Emerging Markets (EMs), to identify and analyze the issues and challenges for the development and regulation of institutional investors, and to make recommendations that EM regulators may consider as they supervise their respective markets. The Project Team

According to the report institutional investors are playing an increasingly important role in the development of EMs. Markets with large numbers of institutional investors tend to be less volatile and allocate resources and capital more efficiently to companies requiring funding. Highly specialized and managing substantial capital, institutional investors are better positioned to put pressure on corporations and their management to improve corporate governance and transparency. By pooling assets, institutional investors can achieve economies of scale, employ high quality investment professionals, develop better investment strategies and build solid risk management systems, all of which result in higher and more stable returns for investors, says IOSCO.

The report emphasises that in light of the challenges ahead, the development of institutional investors in the EMs calls for concerted efforts by both regulators and the market. It requires a pragmatic and sequenced approach by regulators to ensure that such efforts do not destabilise the financial system, and that adequate safeguards are established at both market and regulatory levels.

The report also contains a number of recommendations to help EM regulators and policy makers develop and regulate institutional investors; most of which are obvious. However, it is acknowledged that some frontier markets lack the appropriate financial markets infrastructure to sustain the evolution of sustainable capital markets and investment. We reproduce the key recommendations below.

Capital Market Environment. The foundation of a well-functioning capital market is the protection of property and ownership rights. In addition to a sound legal system, regulators need to promote proper corporate governance standards and other investor protection measures. A capital market that is favorable to institutional investors should have reasonable transaction costs (both explicit and implicit), a broad range of potentially high-quality investment products and flexible trading and hedging mechanisms.

Product Offering and Innovation. The authorisation process for new product issuance should be simple, fast and free of administrative obstacles. It should also be accompanied by strict post-issuance supervision and prompt regulatory actions when risks and violations occur. A multi-tier issuance regime could be used to lower issuance costs and broaden the product offering. Insofar as risks are manageable, regulators should support innovations that improve market efficiency or broaden investor-friendly product offerings.

Multi-pillar Pension System. The aging population is a major concern in many jurisdictions because it burdens the national pension and social security system. This burden could be shared by private pensions and personal savings plans. The development of a multi-pillar pension system, however, requires an appropriate set of tax incentives. Given that the financial performance of pension plans affects future pensioners’ standards of living, institutional investors in this market should be subject to higher prudential and professional standards.

Distribution Channels and Practices. Regulators should broaden the product distribution channels by increasing the type and number of distributors institutional investors can use. Regulators should introduce detailed rules for distribution practices and encourage Self Regulatory Organizations (SROs) to establish best practice standards on suitability, disclosure, marketing and fees.

Market Openness. Regulators should ensure a level playing field for foreign and domestic investors. Policy makers should gradually loosen or remove restrictions on fund repatriation and capital controls. Regulators should also break down barriers that prevent domestic investors from investing abroad.

Human Capital and Professional Integrity. Regulators and SROs should seek to improve the quality and availability of human capital by training and developing local talent and attracting professionals from other industries or overseas. The incentive structure should align the interests of the professionals with those of the investors. Sound licensing, record keeping and supervision systems should be established for industry professionals.

Regulatory Framework and Financial Stability. In accordance with the IOSCO Principles, regulators should prevent market abuse by building sound surveillance capacity and periodically reviewing their regulatory framework and coverage. Regulators should work together domestically and across jurisdictions, to monitor, mitigate and manage systemic risk.

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