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FRIDAY TICKER: OCTOBER 31TH 2014: - The re-election of President Dilma Rousseff on Sunday has important implications for Brazil's Baa2 sovereign rating, as well as for the credit quality of the country's banks, corporations and securitisations, says Moody's. The rating agency says the narrow margin of her victory underscores the challenges she faces as she looks to revive Brazil's lacklustre economic performance - Facebook has reported third quarter results, again showing strongest year-on-year growth in mobile, where daily active users (DAUS) rose by 39% to 703 million, while overall daily users rose 19% to 864 million DAUS - Francisco Partners, a global technology-focused private equity firm, today announced it has completed the acquisition of Vendavo, Inc., a leader in business-to-business (B2B) pricing solutions. David Mitchell, an operating partner of Francisco Partners, will join Vendavo as CEO and lead the company’s worldwide business strategy and operations. Incumbent CEO Neil Lustig will transition into an advisory role with Vendavo. Francisco Partners now has a controlling stake in the Silicon Valley company. The acquisition by Francisco Partners provides additional resources to bolster Vendavo’s aggressive growth strategy, enabling the company to expand sales and marketing while accelerating cloud development. Vendavo completed a record first half of 2014, with nearly 30-percent growth in bookings, and the release of two breakthrough solutions for price and sales effectiveness. Based in Mountain View, Calif., Vendavo provides revenue and price optimisation solutions for B2B mid-market and enterprise companies.Francisco Partners was advised by JMP Securities, and Vendavo was advised by William Blair. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed – The International Finance Corporation, or IFC, issued the four-year, triple-A rated bond only to Japanese retail investors, tapping into the growing interest in low-risk investments with a social or environmental focus. The World Bank, has sold several billion dollars in green bonds over the past six years, with proceeds going to help countries and firms cut greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to climate change. The latest offering, Inclusive Business bonds, would finance firms that work with or sell to the 4.5bn people in the world that make less than $8 a day. IFC said while most poor people do not spend a lot individually, as a whole they represent an estimated $5trn consumer market that firms could tap into - NAKA Mobile, a telecoms and technology specialist based in Switzerland, has claimed the industry’s first virtualised evolved packet core (vEPC). Utilising Cisco’s NFV services, NAKA claims it will transform its network architecture, expand beyond Switzerland, and provide its mobile Internet services to customers across the world - The Internet Society and Alcatel-Lucent have agreed to provide support and equipment for the development of the Bangkok Internet Exchange Point (BKNIX). The project will utilise the Internet Society’s Interconnection and Traffic Exchange (ITE) programme and is intended to deliver a stronger and more robust Internet infrastructure for South East Asia.

IOSCO publishes a report on institutional investors in emerging markets

Thursday, 14 June 2012
IOSCO publishes a report on institutional investors in emerging markets The International Organisation of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) has published  a report on Development and Regulation of Institutional Investors in Emerging Markets, which focuses on a wide range of developmental issues and challenges faced by emerging markets seeking to develop their institutional investor base. Some of these challenges include limited capital market size and liquidity, competition to capital market investment from substitute services, regulatory restrictions, overly dominant distribution channels and constraints on cross-border activities. Additional discussions on related macro-economic and capital market conditions in the emerging markets and analysis of cross-border activities of institutional investors are also included in the report.     http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

The International Organisation of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) has published  a report on Development and Regulation of Institutional Investors in Emerging Markets, which focuses on a wide range of developmental issues and challenges faced by emerging markets seeking to develop their institutional investor base. Some of these challenges include limited capital market size and liquidity, competition to capital market investment from substitute services, regulatory restrictions, overly dominant distribution channels and constraints on cross-border activities. Additional discussions on related macro-economic and capital market conditions in the emerging markets and analysis of cross-border activities of institutional investors are also included in the report.

 

 

The report offers a set of key recommendations for policy makers and regulators looking to attract and better regulate institutional investors in their jurisdictions.  It highlights the importance of the legal protection of property and ownership rights. It also emphasizes the need to ensure reasonable transaction costs, develop flexible trading and hedging mechanisms, remove undue administrative impediments on product authorization processes, build a multi-pillar pension system with tax incentives and provide a level playing field for foreign investors. Finally, the report recommends that regulators periodically review the regulatory framework and coverage, combine deregulation with enhanced supervision and enforcement, and improve coordination with other regulatory bodies to monitor, mitigate and manage systemic risk.

The IOSCO Emerging Markets Committee (EMC) established a Project Team to review the development and regulation of institutional investors in Emerging Markets (EMs), to identify and analyze the issues and challenges for the development and regulation of institutional investors, and to make recommendations that EM regulators may consider as they supervise their respective markets. The Project Team



According to the report institutional investors are playing an increasingly important role in the development of EMs. Markets with large numbers of institutional investors tend to be less volatile and allocate resources and capital more efficiently to companies requiring funding. Highly specialized and managing substantial capital, institutional investors are better positioned to put pressure on corporations and their management to improve corporate governance and transparency. By pooling assets, institutional investors can achieve economies of scale, employ high quality investment professionals, develop better investment strategies and build solid risk management systems, all of which result in higher and more stable returns for investors, says IOSCO.

The report emphasises that in light of the challenges ahead, the development of institutional investors in the EMs calls for concerted efforts by both regulators and the market. It requires a pragmatic and sequenced approach by regulators to ensure that such efforts do not destabilise the financial system, and that adequate safeguards are established at both market and regulatory levels.

The report also contains a number of recommendations to help EM regulators and policy makers develop and regulate institutional investors; most of which are obvious. However, it is acknowledged that some frontier markets lack the appropriate financial markets infrastructure to sustain the evolution of sustainable capital markets and investment. We reproduce the key recommendations below.

Capital Market Environment. The foundation of a well-functioning capital market is the protection of property and ownership rights. In addition to a sound legal system, regulators need to promote proper corporate governance standards and other investor protection measures. A capital market that is favorable to institutional investors should have reasonable transaction costs (both explicit and implicit), a broad range of potentially high-quality investment products and flexible trading and hedging mechanisms.

Product Offering and Innovation. The authorisation process for new product issuance should be simple, fast and free of administrative obstacles. It should also be accompanied by strict post-issuance supervision and prompt regulatory actions when risks and violations occur. A multi-tier issuance regime could be used to lower issuance costs and broaden the product offering. Insofar as risks are manageable, regulators should support innovations that improve market efficiency or broaden investor-friendly product offerings.

Multi-pillar Pension System. The aging population is a major concern in many jurisdictions because it burdens the national pension and social security system. This burden could be shared by private pensions and personal savings plans. The development of a multi-pillar pension system, however, requires an appropriate set of tax incentives. Given that the financial performance of pension plans affects future pensioners’ standards of living, institutional investors in this market should be subject to higher prudential and professional standards.

Distribution Channels and Practices. Regulators should broaden the product distribution channels by increasing the type and number of distributors institutional investors can use. Regulators should introduce detailed rules for distribution practices and encourage Self Regulatory Organizations (SROs) to establish best practice standards on suitability, disclosure, marketing and fees.

Market Openness. Regulators should ensure a level playing field for foreign and domestic investors. Policy makers should gradually loosen or remove restrictions on fund repatriation and capital controls. Regulators should also break down barriers that prevent domestic investors from investing abroad.

Human Capital and Professional Integrity. Regulators and SROs should seek to improve the quality and availability of human capital by training and developing local talent and attracting professionals from other industries or overseas. The incentive structure should align the interests of the professionals with those of the investors. Sound licensing, record keeping and supervision systems should be established for industry professionals.

Regulatory Framework and Financial Stability. In accordance with the IOSCO Principles, regulators should prevent market abuse by building sound surveillance capacity and periodically reviewing their regulatory framework and coverage. Regulators should work together domestically and across jurisdictions, to monitor, mitigate and manage systemic risk.

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