Friday 1st July 2016
NEWS TICKER: Why are the markets up today? Augustin Eden at Accendo Markets has an explanation. He says that “Post-Brexit is years away and the politicians are cleverly stalling the process of, er, starting the process by resigning and stuff like that. You could think of the Brexit process a crudely constructed economic Rube Goldberg machine. It could all go smoothly but it’s more likely that something will go the wrong way at some point. Perhaps a whole section will collapse and have to be re-built; a projectile will miss its target and have to be re-aligned. But until the machine is set going - until Article 50 is invoked - all is stable. Thus we see financials’ shares outperforming even though Moody’s stayed true to its word and carried through with its threat to blanket bomb the sector with downgrades. Late to the party as usual? But let’s not assume things really are improving from here on. Talk of waning volumes indicating a bottom for the recent sell off neglect to take account of one fact: declines can happen on both high and low volumes, but rallies can only happen on the former”. Now you know - Moira Gorman, client director, LGPS at Columbia Threadneedle Investments today in a client note says that UK referendum result, “puts pressure on asset valuations, and will worsen funding ratios given the contraction in gilt yields. However, funds in England and Wales had their triennial valuation in March 2016 so will be able to take their time in considering they may wish to respond in the short to medium term. Possibly of equal importance to them could be the political uncertainty and the potential impact on the timetable and objectives for pooling given the personalities who may lead the government following Prime Minister Cameron’s departure.” --

Latest Video

Responsible investment products set for growth

Wednesday, 11 December 2013
Responsible investment products set for growth Over three quarters of 85 pension fund managers polled by ING Investment Management believe that being environmentally and socially responsible – as well as encouraging good global governance – is important to the future of investment. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Over three quarters of 85 pension fund managers polled by ING Investment Management believe that being environmentally and socially responsible – as well as encouraging good global governance – is important to the future of investment.

Findings from the new survey show that two third of investment professionals responsible for pension funds, already integrate Environmental Social Governance (ESG) factors and/or a Socially Responsible Investment style (SRI) into their investment processes. Nearly half of this (48%) say their appetite for ESG and SRI has increased over the past six months.

Hendrik-Jan Boer, senior portfolio manager for ING IM’s SRI funds: “In recent years there has been a shift within the industry towards more responsible investment products. This research underlines the importance – both professionally and personally – of ESG factors. With three quarters of investors believing that the sector is important for the future of the industry, we expect the demand for socially responsible investments to grow further in the coming years and to become even more commonplace in investors’ portfolios.”



A greater reliance on responsible investment criteria was expected to bear fruit in terms of investment return over the next five years. However, when it came to the reasons for incorporating this in their investment strategy, the majority of respondents (58%) did so due to “a sense of personal responsibility”. In addition, just over half (52%) stated that it was the companies procedure to apply such criteria to investments.

In terms of the most proactive practitioners of these principles, developed economies were perceived to be the most keen with Western Europe (86%) cited by the most respondents, followed by North America (36%) and Australasia (24%). Turning to actual asset owners, pension funds were viewed as the most willing group to incorporate ESG factors within their portfolios – cited by 73% of respondents – while charities (62%) were the second most willing.

“It is certainly positive to see that investors not only believe in the social and intrinsic value of ESG factors, but also believe in the effectiveness of applying such criteria to their investments,” adds Boer. “It is encouraging to note an anticipated shift in attitudes towards ESG from simply being a filter that investors feel they should implement in their portfolios to becoming a genuinely strong investment tool in its own right.”

Related News

Related Articles

Related Blogs

Related Videos

  • Forces shaping the UK pension industry Thursday, 18 October 2012 Forces shaping the UK pension industry
    Rosalind Knowles, partner, Linklaters Pension Practice Group provides the first Keynote Speech at FTSE Global Markets’ Transition Management conference at Gibson…

Current Issue

TWITTER FEED