Sunday 29th March 2015
NEWS TICKER, FRIDAY MARCH 27th 2015: Moody's Investors Service has assigned an A2 rating (stable outlook) to the certificates of deposit issued by Barclays Bank Plc, New York Branch. The certificates of deposits will be direct, unsecured, senior obligations of Barclays Bank plc, issued by its New York Branch and will rank pari passu with all other present and future unsecured and unsubordinated obligations of Barclays Bank Plc - The Straits Times Index (STI) ended +18.51 points higher or +0.54% to 3450.1, taking the year-to-date performance to +2.52%. The FTSE ST Mid Cap Index gained +0.18% while the FTSE ST Small Cap Index gained +0.47%. The top active stocks were SingTel (+1.38%), DBS (-0.15%), UOB (+1.13%), Golden Agri-Res (+7.41%) and Keppel Corp (-1.11%). The outperforming sectors today were represented by the FTSE ST Basic Materials Index (+2.32%). The two biggest stocks of the FTSE ST Basic Materials Index are Midas Holdings (unchanged) and Geo Energy Resources (-0.51%). The underperforming sector was the FTSE ST Oil & Gas Index, which declined -1.06% with Keppel Corp’s share price declining -1.11% and Sembcorp Industries’ share price declining -1.15%. The three most active Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) by value today were the IS MSCI India (-1.43%), SPDR Gold Shares (-1.19%), iShares USD Asia HY Bond ETF (+1.05%). The three most active Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) by value were CapitaMall Trust (-0.92%), Suntec REIT (unchanged), CapitaCom Trust (-1.13%)

Revamped accounting rule to gradually affect US banks

Wednesday, 04 January 2012
Revamped accounting rule to gradually affect US banks Fitch Ratings says a new accounting rule change requiring banks to book losses on loans sooner will have a gradual affect on US bank income statements. In theory, the suggested change would give banks more time to replenish capital cushions by setting aside reserves as a result of projected loan losses, insulating investors. However, the ratings agency does not believe the proposed changes will have anymaterial  impact on the ratings of US banks. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Fitch Ratings says a new accounting rule change requiring banks to book losses on loans sooner will have a gradual affect on US bank income statements. In theory, the suggested change would give banks more time to replenish capital cushions by setting aside reserves as a result of projected loan losses, insulating investors. However, the ratings agency does not believe the proposed changes will have anymaterial  impact on the ratings of US banks.

The United States’ Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) agreed in late December 2011 on a draft proposal that would supersede banks' incurred loan loss approach with a speedier "expected loss" one. Under the model, banks will be required to book projected losses spanning the next 12 months instead of recording losses after they have actually occurred. A formal proposal is expected in 2012.

Ratings agency Fitch believes that if the rule implemented, it would bring greater clarity to bank financial statements as it is forward looking and recognition of exposure is certainly encouraged. Moreover, says Fitch, while changes in accounting for the financial industry coupled with regulatory reform heighten uncertainty, banks have been aggressive in responding earlier to reform suggestions as they have been afforded ample time to do so.



Meanwhile, the has FASB agreed to keep unchanged balance sheet offsetting rules, effectively preserving the single largest balance sheet difference between financial institutions filing under the IFRS framework and US GAAP. However, new common disclosure rules for both regimes provide the necessary information to make adjustments for comparability.

Related News

Related Articles

Related Blogs

Tweets by @DataLend

DataLend is a global securities finance market data provider covering 42,000+ unique securities globally with a total on-loan value of more than $1.8 trillion.

What do our tweets mean? See: http://bit.ly/18YlGjP