Saturday 1st August 2015
NEWS TICKER, FRIDAY, JULY 31ST: US bond markets expect a $900m issue from the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District as early as next year after its rate commission voted yesterday to back the district’s plan to tap the markets. The bonds will continue financing a $4.7bn capital program required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to keep sewers in St. Louis and St. Louis County from regularly overflowing into area creeks and rivers. Already, the district has put $600m toward sewer projects in St. Louis and St. Louis County. MSD customers can consequently continue to expect annual sewer bill hikes each summer. In 2012, the average customer paid $29 monthly. This month, bills rose to an average of $41. After this bond issue, the monthly sewer bill will cost the average household $61 by 2019 - JP Morgan has hired Lebo Moropa, giving the bank its first dedicated prime brokerage and equity finance presence in South Africa, reports Securities Lending Times. Former HSBC trader Moropa has joined the bank in Johannesburg and will focus on synthetic and cash prime brokerage and securities lending, including delta one and will report to Paul Farrell in London. Moropa was a delta one trader at HSBC and has worked for JP Morgan before– Apulia Finance has informed the Luxembourg Stock Exchange of its intent to issue a securitised paper, backed by residential mortgage loans originated by Banca Apulia. The issue date is August 6th and the deal is lead managed by BNP Paribas who is also joint arranger with Finanziaria Internazionale Securitisation Group. Swap counterparty in the transaction is Canadian Imperial Bank of Canada and the clearers are Euroclear and Clearstream. Funding is at three month Euribor with a spread of 0.40% before the step up date and 0.80% after the step up date. The deal is worth a combined €170m of which €153m are Class A asset backed floating rate notes due 2043; €6.79m Class B asset backed notes and €9,84m are Class C asset backed floating rate notes – all due 2043.

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US and Europe facing separate growth tracks, says OECD

Thursday, 29 March 2012
US and Europe facing separate growth tracks, says OECD Economic growth in the G7 countries is expected to be firmer through the first half of 2012, but the recovery remains fragile and will likely proceed at different speeds in North America and Europe, the OECD said in its latest interim economic assessment. The assessment, presented in Paris by OECD chief economist Pier Carlo Padoan, says the G7 economies are projected to grow by 1.9%  in both the first and second quarters of 2012, although a strong variance in outcomes is expected across this group of countries. http://www.ftseglobalmarkets.com/

Economic growth in the G7 countries is expected to be firmer through the first half of 2012, but the recovery remains fragile and will likely proceed at different speeds in North America and Europe, the OECD said in its latest interim economic assessment. The assessment, presented in Paris by OECD chief economist Pier Carlo Padoan, says the G7 economies are projected to grow by 1.9%  in both the first and second quarters of 2012, although a strong variance in outcomes is expected across this group of countries.

“Our forecast for the first half of 2012 points to robust growth in the United States and Canada, but much weaker activity in Europe, where the outlook remains fragile,” says Padoan. “We may have stepped back from the edge of the cliff, but there’s still no room for complacency,” he adds.



 

In the United States, the ongoing rebound in employment, stronger consumer confidence, higher equity prices and credit growth are underpinning the recovery, with growth projected at 2.9%  in the first quarter and 2.8% in the second. Canada is projected to grow by 2.5% during each of the first two quarters

 

The optimistic view on North America contrasts with the much more fragile outlook in Europe, where weak consumer confidence, climbing unemployment and tight credit all point to further  falls in activity.

 

The OECD projects that the euro area’s three largest economies—Germany, France and Italy—will shrink by 0.4% on average during the first quarter, before a moderate 0.9% growth recovery in the second quarter.

 

Seen individually, the German economy is expected to accelerate through the first half of the year, with growth of 0.1% in the first quarter and 1.5% in the second. The French outlook is more muted, with a -0.2 percent reduction in the first quarter followed by 0.9%  growth in the second. In Italy, weak industrial production and household sentiment suggest recession for the first two quarters of the year, but the most recent indicators have been more positive, resulting in slightly better projected growth for the second quarter, the OECD says.

 

In the United Kingdom, the economy is expected to contract by 0.4% and grow by 0.5% in the second quarter.

 

Growth in Japan is projected to rebound strongly in the first quarter to 3.4%, before easing to 1.4%  in the second quarter. A number of factors threaten the recovery, including rising oil prices, weakening activity in emerging market economies, notably China, and a slowdown in world trade growth that reflects weakening global demand. “Government action will continue to be critical, particularly in the euro area, where unfinished policy business on fiscal frameworks, financial firewalls and fundamental structural reforms must move ahead,” Padoan adds.

 

Economic growth in the G7 countries is expected to be firmer through the first half of 2012, but the recovery remains fragile and will likely proceed at different speeds in North America and Europe, the OECD said in its latest Interim Economic Assessment.

The Assessment, presented in Paris by Chief Economist Pier Carlo Padoan, says the G7 economies are projected to grow by 1.9 percent in both the first and second quarters of 2012, although a strong variance in outcomes is expected across this group of countries. (
See the Chief Economist’s presentation)

“Our forecast for the first half of 2012 points to robust growth in the United States and Canada, but much weaker activity in Europe, where the outlook remains fragile,” Mr Padoan said. “We may have stepped back from the edge of the cliff, but there’s still no room for complacency.”
In the United States, the ongoing rebound in employment, stronger consumer confidence, higher equity prices and credit growth are underpinning the recovery, with growth projected at 2.9 percent in the first quarter and 2.8 percent in the second. Canada is projected to grow by 2.5 percent during each of the first two quarters
http://mcmbo1.oecd.org/vgn/images/portal/cit_731/13/63/50008626unemployment.PNG
 
The optimistic view on North America contrasts with the much more fragile outlook in Europe, where weak consumer confidence, climbing unemployment and tight credit all point to further     falls in activity. The OECD projects that the euro area’s three largest economies -  Germany, France and Italy - will shrink by 0.4 percent on average during the first quarter, before a moderate 0.9 percent growth recovery in the second quarter.

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